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 Historical TV and Radio.

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ferval
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PostSubject: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 19 Mar 2013, 12:24

For those of you in the UK, and for those of you outwith who have devious means of accessing the BBC, here's the i player link to last night's drama, The Challenger', with William Hurt as Richard Feynman at the Challenger disaster enquiry. I just loved it.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p00zstkn/The_Challenger/
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 21 Mar 2013, 09:26

Moved "The Cleopatras" to this section.

Part 1 of 8;



http://www.youtube.com/user/TheCleopatras
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 21 Mar 2013, 11:48

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 21 Mar 2013, 12:05

I know Temp likes this one, from 1972, The Shadow of the Tower;

Episode 1 of 13, unfortunately I could not find a playlist but all 13 episodes are on youtube.

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 21 Mar 2013, 12:17

This is the Catherine of Aragon episode from "The Six Wives of Henry VIII"



Have found the Catherine Howard and Anne of Cleves episodes but not the others, at least not in a single video
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 28 Mar 2013, 17:46

For those of you who can access it, Andrew Wallace-Hadrill has a programme on Monday, BBC2, about the work of the Herculaneum Project.
A few weeks ago he gave a lecture series here on the history of Pompeii and Herculaneum since the Bourbons - fascinating and heart breaking in equal measure - and the final one was on the Project. This should be good, unlike last night's car crash about Pompeii with Margaret Mountford who really should stick to eyebrow gymnastics.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01rrld8
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 08 Apr 2013, 16:12

There is a new series starting this evening, in which Lucy Worsley looks at the medical problems of royalty;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/proginfo/2013/15/fit-to-rule.html
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 19 Apr 2013, 15:23

This is a link to the archive of Chronicle programmes;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/archive/chronicle/
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 16 May 2013, 11:51

This is a BBC4 programme about the Edwardian larder;

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 14 Jun 2013, 16:00

These were good fun to watch: the Time Commanders programmes on BBC2. For anyone who hasn't seen them, a group of friends/colleagues would refight ancient battles against the Rome Total War AI.
This one is the Battle of Marathon;

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 26 Jun 2013, 10:40

This was on last night, an interesting programme about Carl Faberge, his Eggs and the final days of the Romanovs;

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 28 Aug 2013, 09:53

The Faberge youtube has been deleted.

Following the success of a Victorian Farm, this autumn there will be a new series about a Tudor Abbey Farm on the Beeb, set in the buildings of the Weald and Down open air museum.

http://www.wealddown.co.uk/

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 07 Jan 2014, 14:25

Anyone else catch this over the holidays?

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 07 Jan 2014, 18:33

I thought it was brill - having known someone who survived the war on arctic convoys. His tales were like those on the programme, understated, no self pity though he suffered and survived several incidents including a sinking. The use of British tanks at Stalingrad was mentioned tho I have read that much that was delivered at such awful cost was not of much use in the Russian campaign. Clarkson did a great job on this programme IMO.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 08 Jan 2014, 13:31

I enjoyed it as well, Priscilla, shocking about the Merchant Navy men having their pay stopped the moment their ship was sunk.
............................................................................................
Clarkson has made two earlier documentaries, one about Arnhem,



and one about the St Nazaire raid,

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 25 Mar 2014, 20:03

We seem to be getting some programmes up here, north of the Wall, that aren't being shown down south, at least at the moment, and might interest some of you.
This one was on last night and a very decent effort it was too. http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b03z2d1g/The_Machine_Gun_and_Skyes_Band_of_Brothers/

Next week, there's this new series for you maritime buffs to look out for on iplayer,
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b040n4kh
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 04 Apr 2014, 13:19

@ferval wrote:

Next week, there's this new series for you maritime buffs to look out for on iplayer,
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b040n4kh
 Couldn't get that link to work there, Ferv so have put in a new one;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01n490d

The first programme is about the Cutty Sark, nos 2,3 and 4 about the cable ship Mackay-Bennett, the blockade runner Robert E Lee and HMS Hood
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 04 Apr 2014, 15:02

Must try and find the programme about the "Cutty Sark" because I did see that vessel in Greenwich while I lived in London.  I have read that BBC are re-making Poldark.  The original was a fine guilty pleasure back in the day.  The BBC are also making "Far from the Madding Crowd".  They have cast Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba.  I'm sure she's a fine actress (haven't seen her in anything) but I hope they go the "wiggy" route at least.  I may have disrupted the 1967 film of "Far from the Madding Crowd" for the friends who accompanied me to the cinema by saying "But she's supposed to have black hair" because Julie Christie (blonde) was playing Bathsheba.  I don't know if I would have liked the film better if I had not previously read the book.  By the way, any blondes or used-to-be blondes, I don't have anything against blondes but I felt that Ms Christie (who I had liked in other things, eg "Billy Liar" and "Doctor Zhivago") was miscast as the female lead.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 01 May 2014, 22:00

Did anyone see the adaptation of Daphne du Maurier's "Jamaica Inn" on the BBC at Easter? Was it any good? I missed it but a friend said it was somewhat dated and "Boys' Own". I thought the novel was wonderful when I was 14 - but I thought some of Dennis Wheatley's books were good when I was 14.

Not strictly TV, but on YouTube, the following link is the first in a series of videos breaking down how to replicate the image of a wolfhound from the Staffordshire Hoard. It's interesting to me though I'm not skilled enough to accomplish such work
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIsXMMl2T_8
Most of the videos on the channel are concerning Celtic knotwork - I might be able to do the most basic ones.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 06 May 2014, 14:30

I was looking up something else on Wikipedia and came across one of the children's ITV series from my childhood, "William Tell"  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventures_of_William_Tell

But I was interested to read that scripts were written by black-listed American writers (from the McCarthy witch-hunts era) for this and other "British" series of the time.  The film "Fellow Traveller" did ring a dim and distant bell.  I also thought it was funny that where Wales stood in for Switzerland there were sometimes cars visible in the distance.  I never noticed the cars if I'm honest - mind you I've never seen the jeep in the Sophia Loren and Charlton Heston version of "El Cid" no matter how hard I try when it's repeated on TV.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 25 May 2014, 07:18

A real treat tonight on BBC4 at 8.00pm - John Webster's superb "The Duchess of Malfi" (written around 1612/13), staged at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, the indoor candlelit theatre that lies within the Globe in London.

Just before the play itself, at 7.00pm, another excellent programme: Professor James Shapiro (he's really good) presents "The Mysterious Mr Webster". Webster's plays were so dark and macabre even the Jacobeans were shocked. It was once said that he "saw the skull beneath the skin". There was a nice little cameo of a very young Webster in the film "Shakespeare in Love": he was the lad sitting outside the Globe enjoying dangling a live mouse (by its tail) in front of a hungry cat.

Two of the most memorable quotes from "The Duchess of Malfi":

"Cover her face; mine eyes dazzle; she died young."

"I do account this world but a dog-kennel."




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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 25 May 2014, 12:26

Thanks for the heads-up Temp.

The Bard of Stratford-upon-Avon is undoubtedly one of the greatest poets in the English language but it's good that the BBC has found time and space for one of the other Elizabethan and Jacobean playwrites. John Webster would not have been my first choice though. I would have listed Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, William Davenant, Richard Brome, and Thomas Kyd ahead of him. But it's a welcome development nonetheless.

I certainly rate Professor Shapiro too. He presented and excellent program a couple of years ago called The King & The Playwright about James I and Shakespeare. Looking forward to both programs tonite.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 26 May 2014, 10:43

@Vizzer wrote:


The Bard of Stratford-upon-Avon is undoubtedly one of the greatest poets in the English language ...


Yes, our Willie Wobbleweapon could certainly bombast out a nice bit of blank verse with the best of them when the mood was on him. Nice to see Webster's play, though. Wish we could have a bit more Marlowe and Jonson too. The others can be a bit tedious, unless you're really into Elizabethan/Jacobean drama.

@Vizzer wrote:
I certainly rate Professor Shapiro too. He presented and excellent program a couple of years ago called The King & The Playwright about James I and Shakespeare. Looking forward to both programs tonite.


I think Professor Shapiro is lovely. The Guardian has been very sniffy about him, but I really appreciate his delightfully enthusiastic - almost childlike - approach to his subject. He is lost in the wonder of it all and that's infectious. He is man after my own kidney.

PS Forgot to mention that A Cock and Bull Story - the BBC film of the unfilmable The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman was also on last night. Michael Winterbottom directs it and it stars Steve Coogan as Tristram and Stephen Fry as Parson Yorrick. They've done it as a film of a film being made - a bit like The French Lieutenant's Woman. I've recorded it, but it should be on IPlayer. I love Sterne: he was post-modern before modern which was a brilliant thing to be. But then Webster was too, also Shakespeare at times.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 30 May 2014, 08:50

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Must try and find the programme about the "Cutty Sark" because I did see that vessel in Greenwich while I lived in London.

The series is being repeated on BBC4. The first episode was last night at 8pm.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p01n4kb7/clydebuilt-the-ships-that-made-the-commonwealth-1-cutty-sark
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 30 May 2014, 12:53

A long time ago, back in the days of the BBC History Messageboards, someone (I can't remember who) suggested the BBC make a programme about test pilot Eric "Winkle" Brown.
Well, now they have and it will be shown on BBC2 this Sunday (1st June) at 9pm.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b045pbq2
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 30 May 2014, 18:25

@Triceratops wrote:
A long time ago, back in the days of the BBC History Messageboards, someone (I can't remember who) suggested the BBC make a programme about test pilot Eric "Winkle" Brown.
Well, now they have and it will be shown on BBC2 this Sunday (1st June) at 9pm.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b045pbq2
Thanks for the Heads Up - his Vampire, the first jet to land on an aircraft carrier - was, and probably still is, preserved at the FAA Museum at Yeovilton
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 24 Jun 2014, 14:14

@ferval wrote:
We seem to be getting some programmes up here, north of the Wall, that aren't being shown down south, at least at the moment, and might interest some of you.
This one was on last night and a very decent effort it was too. http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b03z2d1g/The_Machine_Gun_and_Skyes_Band_of_Brothers/




This programme will be getting a nationwide showing on 4th July at 9pm (BBC2)
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 24 Jun 2014, 16:11

Right, I wonder if you'll get "The Pipers of the Trenches" sometime as well.
I see that the first of the Bannockburn programmes is on next Saturday too. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01lyxwj/broadcasts/upcoming
All this attention to things Jockish, I wonder why?
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sat 28 Jun 2014, 12:16

@Temperance wrote:


I think Professor Shapiro is lovely. The Guardian has been very sniffy about him, but I really appreciate his delightfully enthusiastic - almost childlike - approach to his subject. He is lost in the wonder of it all and that's infectious. He is man after my own kidney
While I do enjoy an occasional visit to "The Guardian" website, the Powers that Be there can be rather snobbish.  There was a very acid review of "Death in Paradise" some while ago - inferring that it was the sort of show to be enjoyed by the older generation in their carpet slippers (do the older generations wear 'em now - after all, the older generation rocked to the sound of the Beatles and Stones et al back in the day).  I quite liked that show.  It's nice (to me at least) to watch something that isn't too high brow sometimes.  However, I do enjoy the Guardian's "reel history" reviews [I think I found them through this site - not quite sure] where films (not necessarily ones that have just been released) are examined for entertainment value and for historical accuracy.  Needless to say "Braveheart" did not gain kudos in either category.  Unfortunately, some of the people who comment on the thread don't seem to get the point of the thread - that it's a fairly humorous take on "historical" films.  "300 - Rise of an Empire" was savaged (I think "Ninja Revenge Barbie" was the expression used about the character depicted by Eva Green - who to be fair to her could only do what she could with the material she was given).  A load of Eva Green fanboys had posted on the site.  One of the posts was something like (paraphrased) "I don't want a history lesson, I want T&A".  It amazes me when people don't want history to be true to the facts - though I must admit in my time I have enjoyed books that "bent" the facts, though I did not realise that at the time. (I'm not referring to the Historian who shall not be named).  I've gone a bit off-topic, Temperance - at least [at least not to my knowledge] Professor Shapiro has not come over all shivery on a programme yet.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sat 28 Jun 2014, 17:42

Shapiro may or may not be the of the shivery persuasion, LiR, but he certainly knows his stuff; he therefore gets my vote.

I very much like people who are not afraid to admit to the odd shiver now and again. I bet Michael Hicks has never shivered in his life.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sat 28 Jun 2014, 21:37

@Temperance wrote:
Shapiro may or may not be the of the shivery persuasion, LiR, but he certainly knows his stuff; he therefore gets my vote.

I very much like people who are not afraid to admit to the odd shiver now and again. I bet Michael Hicks has never shivered in his life.


Temperance and LIR,

my reading here today started with "shiver" and "shivery"...I didn't understand it...but had a feeling it had something to do with the Dutch "huiveren" as the sounding of the two words ressemble each other and from the context it wasn't contradictory either...and indeed, when looking in the dictionary "huiveren" was exactly the Dutch translation of "shiver"...

That said, perhaps because I don't know who Shapiro is, nor Michael Hicks...I don't understand the "pointe" (punchline???) of the sentence...if the honourable ladies can...

Kind regards and with esteem to both,

Paul.

PS: if it only can with an explanation of two three pages to come to the point...don't get tired with such an exercise...
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sat 28 Jun 2014, 23:40

It's fairly mundane to be truthful PR. Professor Shapiro and Michael Hicks are British historians who sometimes grace the "goggle-box" [British slang for the TV].  Now as for the shivering, there was a documentary programme on the TV last year about the archeological dig in a Leicester car-park where the skeleton alleged to belong to Richard III was found.  A female historian [I think her name is Philippa Langley but I have not checked with Google] said that she felt a shiver (trembling) when she was on or near the spot where the body was later found, so references to a historian having the shivers are made jokingly on this site at the historian's (that I think is Philippa Langley) expense. Here is a link to an online dictionary about the word 'shiver':-  http://www.thefreedictionary.com/shiver  Sometimes in England when one shivers or trembles unexpectedly one says "It's somebody walking over my grave" though I don't know the origin of the saying.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 30 Jun 2014, 21:28

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
It's fairly mundane to be truthful PR. Professor Shapiro and Michael Hicks are British historians who sometimes grace the "goggle-box" [British slang for the TV].  Now as for the shivering, there was a documentary programme on the TV last year about the archeological dig in a Leicester car-park where the skeleton alleged to belong to Richard III was found.  A female historian [I think her name is Philippa Langley but I have not checked with Google] said that she felt a shiver (trembling) when she was on or near the spot where the body was later found, so references to a historian having the shivers are made jokingly on this site at the historian's (that I think is Philippa Langley) expense. Here is a link to an online dictionary about the word 'shiver':-  http://www.thefreedictionary.com/shiver  Sometimes in England when one shivers or trembles unexpectedly one says "It's somebody walking over my grave" though I don't know the origin of the saying.


LIR, with all my religious Darwin stuff I would nearly forget to thank you for the immediate enlightenment, which explains completely all my questions...

un grand merci from your friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 30 Jun 2014, 21:41

OOPS Lir and I forgot that, when I first read it, I wanted to comment on:
"  A female historian [I think her name is Philippa Langley but I have not checked with Google] said that she felt a shiver (trembling) when she was on or near the spot where the body was later found, so references to a historian having the shivers are made jokingly on this site at the historian's (that I think is Philippa Langley) expense. "

I remember that on the old ex-BBC messageboard a lady said that she had a strange feeling when entering the wood where there was in the past a (I don't remember what) battle with many deads...nobody said anything but she has not that long posted...perhaps with such an entourage of "logical" ones...as a Nordmann and others, where I also reckon myself in...I think many are afraid to enter in such a bunch of...

LIR, with esteem to all the sophisticated and less sophisticated posts that I read from you,

Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 20 Aug 2014, 10:04

The Beeb are planning to film Bernard Cornwell's "The Last Kingdom"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2014/the-last-kingdom
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 10 Oct 2014, 16:11

Put this on here. BBC videos have a habit of vanishing from youtube;

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 05 Nov 2014, 12:35

BBC4 are starting a re-run of the 1964 series The Great War this Sunday evening. It is on youtube for those who cannot access BBC.

Episode 1;

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 07 Nov 2014, 21:12

Triceratops,

thank you very much for this series that I up till now never saw.
But seeing the first episode I have as always some mixed feelings. If I understand it well, although from the historians who were consulted I don't recognize one single name, it is the historian Röhl's line which is followed...?

Some great debate on Historum, my thoughts on the last page:

http://historum.com/european-history/77683-germany-not-responsible-outbreak-world-war-i-29.html

It will be perhaps a never ending debate...?

Kind regards and with esteem, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 07 Nov 2014, 23:13

Paul - it's not a series following John Rohl who was only 26 in 1964 (when the series was made) and was just embarking on his academic career. The Great War was the work of John Terraine (who was a BBC popular historian) and Correlli Barnett an expert military historian. (Barnett is also one of my favourite of all historians.)

Mrs Vizzer bought me the DVD box set of The Great War when it was released about 10 years ago. I was surprised, however, to find that the box set did not include the program That Was The Great War That Was about the making of the series. So if anyone knows if that is to be re-broadcast or if it's available anywhere then do keep us posted.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 09 Nov 2014, 21:40

Vizzer, thank you very much for this inside information. As I said looking to the names in the film I didn't recognize anyone. To enlighten my lack of knowledge I did some research. As ever the wikipedias come first on Google...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Terraine
http://www.theguardian.com/news/2004/jan/01/guardianobituaries.obituaries
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Correlli_Barnett
http://www.lrb.co.uk/v08/n13/paul-addison/warfare-and-welfare


Kind regards and with esteem for your historical knowledge, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 10 Nov 2014, 15:46

@Vizzer wrote:
Paul - it's not a series following John Rohl who was only 26 in 1964 (when the series was made) and was just embarking on his academic career. The Great War was the work of John Terraine (who was a BBC popular historian) and Correlli Barnett an expert military historian. (Barnett is also one of my favourite of all historians.)

Mrs Vizzer bought me the DVD box set of The Great War when it was released about 10 years ago. I was surprised, however, to find that the box set did not include the program That Was The Great War That Was about the making of the series. So if anyone knows if that is to be re-broadcast or if it's available anywhere then do keep us posted.


Vizzer, is this the one ?

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 10 Nov 2014, 15:59

Sorry Vizzer, not the one you were looking for.

One of the photos in the title sequence, the skeleton of a German soldier at Beaumont Hamel, taken by the British Army's official photographer, Ernest Brooks;
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 17 Nov 2014, 11:56

@Triceratops wrote:
Put this on here. BBC videos have a habit of vanishing from youtube;
Which is exactly what has happened.
Over the weekend I went to the cinema and saw this BFI restoration of an original 1927 film;



Barham and Malaya play the parts of Invincible and Inflexible
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 07 Dec 2014, 11:06

This was broadcast late on Friday night and gives a penetrating insight into the recent past. How much has changed - and how little!


Jeremy Thorpe - The Silent Conspiracy.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04wz633
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 07 Dec 2014, 19:13

@ferval wrote:
This was broadcast late on Friday night and gives a penetrating insight into the recent past. How much has changed - and how little!


Jeremy Thorpe - The Silent Conspiracy.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04wz633
Note how they waited till the day after his death (you cannot libel a dead person). Filthy tactics, BBC, very filthy tactics - if you had any confidence in the veracity of this story, it should have been broadcast many years ago, otherwise at least wait until the man has been buried


(edited and amplified)
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 10 Feb 2015, 15:25

Thursday 12th February BBC4 9.00pm documentary presented by Michael Wood: "Shakespeare's Mother".
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 24 Jul 2015, 16:30

Britain's Forgotten Slave Owners;




watch or download before it disappears

 It's disappeared.


Last edited by Triceratops on Thu 22 Oct 2015, 10:10; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 28 Jul 2015, 12:21

Part 2;

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 22 Oct 2015, 10:07

Ferval, Vizzer and Anglo-Norman have been chatting about this over on the BBC boards;

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 22 Oct 2015, 11:17

I see this starts tonight: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0344rz7

Temp should take a look, it's been described as GOT without the sex and dragons. I must watch if for no other reason than the Herald saying that the theme tune sounds like Jeanette Krankie caught in a wringer.

That recalls an event I was at a few months ago associated with an international Women's Aid conference. As part of the entertainment they wheeled on an all women group with a name which was an amalgam of some alleged Gaelic words meaning something like 'Screeching Cats". There was nothing wrong with their actual musicianship but they delivered an interminable programme of pseudo Celtic mystical wailings until we all wished they would disappear into the swirling mists of the Celtic twilight.
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