A discussion forum for history enthusiasts everywhere
 
HomeHome  ShortcutsShortcuts  FAQFAQ  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  

Share | 
 

 Individuals in another culture

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Caro
Censura


Posts : 1048
Join date : 2012-01-09

PostSubject: Individuals in another culture   Mon 16 Jan 2012, 03:25

Early New Zealand wasn’t very tolerant to Chinese or other Asians, and for many years there was an extra poll tax if they entered the country. (Things may not have changed as much as you would wish.) But still plenty came in, mostly for the gold-mining. They usually kept themselves fairly solitary or occasionally in family groups, or at least remaining in a mainly Asian community.

But some didn’t and I don’t know what would have differentiated them from others. Two in particular that I know of really immersed themselves in New Zealand culture and made names for themselves and were highly respected.

In New Plymouth Chew Chong arrived via Australia in 1867 and shipped sheet metal to China before finding a Chinese delicacy, Jew’s ear fungus growing on native trees. For several years gathering this crop was the main cash supply for dairy farmers in the area and earned more than butter exports. He branched out into other fields, including erecting creameries and butter factories and invented a rotary butter worker and an air cooler and had his own cows. He married a local settler’s daughter and they had 11 children. On two occasions he was donated bags of sovereigns, the second time with an illuminated address which stated that he had saved 'many a family from want and penury' through his export trade in fungus, and had 'led the way' in butter manufacture in Taranaki.

The other man, Kazuyuki Tsukigawa, was Japanese and jumped ship in Dunedin in 1895 and made his way to a place not far from where I live. He worked on a farm till 1902 when he went back to Japan for four months and then returned to his previous employment. He later worked his way up to being a sea captain, and became a Salvation Armyist. He became a New Zealand citizen in 1907, possibly the first Japanese person in do so and also married locally. He made trips to Japan as an unofficial trade ambassador and again was highly valued by his community. Despite this and honours he was put under house arrest during WWII as an enemy alien – at much the same time as his son won the Military Award for gallantry fighting for the Allies in Europe.

Recently a street in his hometown of Balclutha (30kms from where I live) was named after him, though there was some concern – fortunately taken no notice of by the council – that the name might be difficult for people posting letters there.

http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/biographies/2c17/1

http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/biographies/3t42/1

There must be many stories like this of people who immerse themselves in a new culture, but I would think usually they would be part of a group. (And quite frequently groups to new countries keep themselves apart.) These two men were completely separate from their respective cultures, while retaining some links to their home countries. There’s no real indication that they were estranged from their home families when they left. Is it just that people generally feel themselves at home wherever they happen to be?

Caro.
Back to top Go down
Islanddawn
Censura


Posts : 1982
Join date : 2012-01-05
Location : Greece

PostSubject: Re: Individuals in another culture   Mon 16 Jan 2012, 05:13

Think how you would re-act/act in that situation and you will have your answer Caro. But there is no golden rule that can apply to every immigrant and how an immigrant behaves in a new country is entirely dependant on the attitude of the individual and for variety of very different reasons.

The situation in the native home, the experiences of the immigrant in his native home, the reason for immigration, the personality of the immigrant, the situation in the host country and the attitude toward outsiders in the host country all play a part in how an immigrant adapts to and behaves in his/her new enviroment.

It is also worth noting that the majority of immigrants leave home with the intention of returning. In my experience, these are the immigrants who tend to cluster together in communities. But returning home also becomes increasingly difficult as time goes on and again for a variety of different reasons. People change in a new enviroment, they become settled in home and work, their children are part of the new country and not the old, whether they intend it or not an immigrant does become involved in or part of a wider community and as the immigrant himself has changed so has the native country and maybe not in a beneficial way. All this and more can and does play a part, so whilst an immigrant may leave with the intention of returning, it is usually only a minority that can actually make the transition back after living away for many years.

Yet some immigrants leave home with the realisation or intention of not returning home to live and they are generally the people who will immerse themselves fully in a new culture and adapt to a new life far more readily than the former.
Back to top Go down
Gilgamesh of Uruk
Censura


Posts : 1397
Join date : 2011-12-27

PostSubject: Re: Individuals in another culture   Mon 16 Jan 2012, 16:02

There was a story fairly recently about the Irish government setting up a scheme to help take care of retutning migrants, more or less in recognition of the value their remittances home had been to the country. I suppose that may have been a victim of the financial cutbacks. Does anyone know anything about it?
Back to top Go down
Islanddawn
Censura


Posts : 1982
Join date : 2012-01-05
Location : Greece

PostSubject: Re: Individuals in another culture   Mon 16 Jan 2012, 16:43

Greece had a similar scheme and a package of incentives to encourage immigrants to return also, Urn. Can't say what happened to that either, more than likely slashed along with everything else.
Back to top Go down
Vizzer
Decemviratus Legibus Scribundis


Posts : 701
Join date : 2012-05-12

PostSubject: Re: Individuals in another culture   Sat 13 Jul 2013, 13:06

One early story is that of Arcade Houang (or Arcadio Huang) who was one of the first Chinese people to settle in Europe. He lived in Paris in the early 18th century during the reign of Louis XVI the Sun King. Houang was sponsored by the Church and was part of a team producing the first French-Chinese dictionary and grammar. He married a Frenchwoman and they had a child although Houang's wife died shortly after childbirth and Houang himself followed a year later aged only 36.

After his death much of the credit for the work on the dictionary and grammar was taken by his colleague Etienne Fourmont. Recent research, however, has sought to review the record.

You can read more about Fourmont and Houang here: http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100123560
Back to top Go down
 

Individuals in another culture

View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Res Historica History Forum :: The history of people ... :: Individuals-