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 The Tumbleweed Suite

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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Oct 2016, 10:19

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Oct 2016, 14:18

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Oct 2016, 15:57

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ferval
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Oct 2016, 16:41

It's 4 pm and almost dark but it has been the most glorious October, sunny, dry and with unusually little wind so the leaf colours are still vivid. My wee acer is like a flame in the front garden, most years the leaves are stripped almost overnight but I have been able to admire them for a week this time.

Unfortunately it's forecast to pour down this evening so there will be a lot of drookit guisers about.
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ferval
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Oct 2016, 17:27

Norm - I see you lurking there, tell us what you're up to? Are you going coven-peeping in the forest tonight or galloping wildly on that black stallion through the darkness?
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Oct 2016, 20:28

It's been a lovely October here too, and with no Autumnal gales yet so all the coloured leaves are still on the trees. I've been picking ripe tomatoes up until just a couple of weeks ago, whereupon the nights suddenly started to get chilly. But I then harvested the remaining green tomatoes to make a big batch of Gujerati green tomato curry for the freezer. And I've still got aubergines, peppers and chillies slowly ripening on their bushes ... plus a lone courgette plant, obviously made of sterner stuff than his fellows, who continues to flower regularly and who is still producing plump priapic fruit. But while it's still very warm during the day, it is now getting cold at night and I've started lighting a fire in the evenings, especially as this weekend I'm full (it being a long weekend as Tousainte is a national holiday).

As regards halloween ... I'm a 2km walk away from the village along a narrow track through dark forest inhabited by real wild animals that squeak, grunt, rustle and snuffle as you pass. Even the dog doesn't dare venture far up the lane at night on his own ... but then he is a bit of a wuss. I never usually get any trick-or-treaters: the village kiddies are probably too wary - or too occupied at home with facebook - to venture this far. Either that or I've acquired a reputation as a grumpy old recluse who might just play a trick on them!


Last edited by Meles meles on Mon 31 Oct 2016, 20:51; edited 2 times in total
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Oct 2016, 20:35

Beautiful day here too, but then it all went pear-shaped and started coming down in buckets just as the little darlings were all kitted out and about to go out on their door to door extortion racket. Isn't life just dandy sometimes?
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 01 Nov 2016, 05:52

Definitely not beautiful weather here, the indian summer ended yesterday with the arrival of a Mediterranian hurricane known as Medicanes, temperatures plummeted and winter arrived with a bang. Literally, when a lightning strike connected with a power pole in the village, it was quite spectacular acually as I just happened to be looking out the window when it occurred but it did leave us without power for a few hours. It is still windy and cloudy this morning but the rain has stopped for now.
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ferval
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 10:43

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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 11:09

Trigger biscuits? I remember them!

Oh wait, wrong thread ...
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 11:32

@ferval wrote:

High Court rules only parliament can trigger Brexit

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/nov/03/parliament-must-trigger-brexit-high-court-rules[/url]

Yes, and finally some sanity has been restored. It will be interesting to see how Mayhem reacts now though.....
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ferval
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 11:50

If the Supreme Court upholds the High Court's decision, will the government then take its appeal to the ECJ?

That would take the biscuit.
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 12:23

We'll just have to wait and see how the cookie crumbles.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 12:40

The majority either way might well still be wafer thin .... even after all the Belgian waffle.
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 12:44

I see Liam Fox wants this referred now to the supreme court. He reckons it's crackers.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 12:51

I doubt any politicians give a fig - roll on the next general election!
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 13:46

If it means getting rid of the ginger nut I'm all for it!

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 13:53

I bet he'd survive ... he's a slippery liar and all round jammy-dodger
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Nov 2016, 23:00

There hasn't been this much international interest in the crusty English judiciary and the fudgy British constitution since 1999 when the House of Lords ruled on whether the then Home Secretary (in a bit of a flap) Jack Straw's hurried house arrest of Augusto Pinochet was cricket or not.



To dunk or not to dunk?
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 04 Nov 2016, 10:03

Boris Johnson at the yesterday's Spectator Awards said: "In the words of our great prime minister, they understand that Brexit means Brexit and we are going to make a Titanic success of it.”

... does the man ever think before opening his mouth?
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 04 Nov 2016, 10:06

Brexit effects so many countries that's why it is of interest, not only EU members but also the US, Canada, Australia and other Commonwealth countries. Brexit also changes things geopolitically for many, it isn't just about trade and the re-birth of the Empire as Brexiters like to bang on about.

Edit. Uh ho MM snuck in there, this is in reply to Viz.
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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 04 Nov 2016, 12:47

Here's one for you, ID;

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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 04 Nov 2016, 13:47

I've seen that on Twatter and it is a bit confusing as it didn't say where that paper is from. For a start 'Hellas' would not be printed on a passport, the official name of Greece is the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία/Elliniki Dimokratia) and that is what is printed on all official documents, not Hellas. Ellas/Hellas/Ellatha is the ancient name that is still used by the inhabitants of Greece to refer to their country, not the name Greece or the term Greeks. That's for the barbarians.... Smile
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 04 Nov 2016, 14:06

They're asking for a Geek passport. Would a Nerd passport be acceptable?
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 06 Nov 2016, 17:11

Can't find the 'This Day in History' thread but apparently it's James Naismith's 153rd birthday (he invented Basket Ball it transpires).

In the Shire Hall in my hometown there is at present an exhibition about "J R R Tolkein in Staffordshire" - I might rouse myself to have a gander round it, albeit I never got "into" The Lord of the Rings the way other people seem to have.

I've always had a feeling that Boris Johnson is not stupid but that he likes to put on a bumbling act. Perhaps he would have been suitable as a lecturer of Classics in a university, though there may not be many openings in that field.  I think his problem about being out of touch with people stems from coming from a wealthy background and not really knowing how the poor dogs underneath live.

ID, I think the most ardent of Little Englanders know that the days of Empire are long gone now.  In fact, some of the problems we (as in we in the UK) now face are because of the history of Empire.  I think at least one of the reasons why so many people want to come to the UK (when they could apply for asylum in other European countries) is that English is the second language for myriads of folk - because their ancestors had English imposed on them when their countries were part of the British Empire.  Then again (should this be in the colonies thread?) I was friendly with a widower who was originally from Nigeria (he became a naturalised Briton) who said that he reckoned there was less corruption when that land was administered by the British; he was from Benin originally and maintained that Benin had never been fully subjugated by the British.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 06 Nov 2016, 18:26

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Can't find the 'This Day in History' thread but apparently it's James Naismith's 153rd birthday (he invented Basket Ball it transpires).

In the Shire Hall in my hometown there is at present an exhibition about "J R R Tolkein in Staffordshire" - I might rouse myself to have a gander round it, albeit I never got "into" The Lord of the Rings the way other people seem to have.

I've always had a feeling that Boris Johnson is not stupid but that he likes to put on a bumbling act. Perhaps he would have been suitable as a lecturer of Classics in a university, though there may not be many openings in that field.  I think his problem about being out of touch with people stems from coming from a wealthy background and not really knowing how the poor dogs underneath live.

ID, I think the most ardent of Little Englanders know that the days of Empire are long gone now.  In fact, some of the problems we (as in we in the UK) now face are because of the history of Empire.  I think at least one of the reasons why so many people want to come to the UK (when they could apply for asylum in other European countries) is that English is the second language for myriads of folk - because their ancestors had English imposed on them when their countries were part of the British Empire.  Then again (should this be in the colonies thread?) I was friendly with a widower who was originally from Nigeria (he became a naturalised Briton) who said that he reckoned there was less corruption when that land was administered by the British; he was from Benin originally and maintained that Benin had never been fully subjugated by the British.
Lady,

"Perhaps he would have been suitable as a lecturer of Classics in a university"

I wonder with his "appearance"...or is that the nowadays "style" for a lecturer in a university?...I agree for a politician it doesn't matter perhaps...as oddities are many times a trademark for a politician?

"I think at least one of the reasons why so many people want to come to the UK (when they could apply for asylum in other European countries) is that English is the second language for myriads of folk"

Is it not because as in the US you don't need an identity card as in Europe. So you can easier hide in the anonimity not disturbed by the police? And Spanish is perhaps the second world language, but migrants don't invade Spain?

Kind regards, Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 06 Nov 2016, 20:45

I was thinking he might be suitable as a lecturer of Classics because he did well in that domain when a student at university - at least that's my understanding.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Johnson  If you scroll down the Wikipedia page linked to the section about Eton and Oxford it mentions his studies. Actually having looked albeit briefly at his history I hadn't realised that he has quite a mixed ancestry - not Anglo-Saxon since time immemorial, though he does have the fair hair that was associated with the Anglo-Saxons (or has the theory that Anglo-Saxons were for the most part fair-haired been revised - I can't keep up to date with all the revisionist theories?).

I didn't say that I thought many people having English as a second language was the whole story why people want to come to the UK.  The reason you give about people being able to get under the radar* more easily without an identity card does make sense, I must admit.

* Paul, I'm sure you have already come across the phrase - but just in case "under the radar" means "with stealth" or covertly.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 08 Nov 2016, 19:01

Forget about Hillary and Donald (or even about Jill and Gary) - who's gonna win outta Tsetska and Rumen?



Bulgaria's presidential election also takes place this week.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 08 Nov 2016, 22:11

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
I was thinking he might be suitable as a lecturer of Classics because he did well in that domain when a student at university - at least that's my understanding.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Johnson  If you scroll down the Wikipedia page linked to the section about Eton and Oxford it mentions his studies. Actually having looked albeit briefly at his history I hadn't realised that he has quite a mixed ancestry - not Anglo-Saxon since time immemorial, though he does have the fair hair that was associated with the Anglo-Saxons (or has the theory that Anglo-Saxons were for the most part fair-haired been revised - I can't keep up to date with all the revisionist theories?).

I didn't say that I thought many people having English as a second language was the whole story why people want to come to the UK.  The reason you give about people being able to get under the radar* more easily without an identity card does make sense, I must admit.

* Paul, I'm sure you have already come across the phrase - but just in case "under the radar" means "with stealth" or covertly.

Lady in retirement,

thank you very much for your reply and as for "under the radar" we have exactly the same in Dutch: "onder de radar" and I presume our French language compatriots say the same: "sous le radar"...I don't know if our German language compatriots say then also "unter dem Radar" Wink ...

And now I understand why they say the " American stealth bomber" Wink


Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 08 Nov 2016, 22:17

Addendum to the previous message.

Lady, indeed "unter dem Radar"
http://www.linguee.de/deutsch-englisch/uebersetzung/unter+dem+radar.html

and stealth:
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stealth_%E2%80%93_Unter_dem_Radar

Kind regards, Paul.
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 Nov 2016, 07:46

While the great slow motion car crash that was the US presidential election sank to its inevitable flaccid and soul-destroying denouement the media overnight reported variously that Clinton supporters' good mood had come suddenly crashing down after Florida, that the dollar has crashed on every world exchange, that a Canadian immigration website crashed, and now I hear from the BBC that the candidates represented two juggernauts of political ideology which have crashed in a head-on collision at maximum speed. No wonder I slept so poorly last night.

Here in Norway we can see a bright side to all this. Our little island off Tromsø which, as you can see, supplies the now leader of the free world with a thatch can look forward to at least four years of prosperity.

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ferval
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 Nov 2016, 08:14

There's another bright side -

BRITAIN has woken up relieved to find its idiotic act of self-harm earlier this year is now a piffling historical footnote.

Across the UK, Britons are secretly delighted that when the great disasters of 2016 are remembered, Brexit will be completely overshadowed by America’s embrace of fascism.


http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/international/relieved-britain-no-longer-biggest-fk-up-of-2016-20161109116771


I've haven't slept soundly either, just like June 24, I stupidly switched the radio on around 6 and that was that. Trump does murder sleep.
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 Nov 2016, 09:39

Yes it has been a bit like that here too. The cat woke me at 4.30 to go out and of course I couldn't go back to sleep wondering what was happening across the way so that was the end of that. We now await next year with unbaited breathe. Sigh.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 Nov 2016, 09:40

Yes me too - I woke up for a few minutes about 3 am and turned on the television just to see how she was doing - never got back to sleep too busy rushing to send money back before the dollar hit the markets.
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 Nov 2016, 13:37

In a few months it could well be food parcels you're sending them Smile

However for sanity's sake ... nunc est bibendum (as Horace once remarked when faced with equally dire prospects) - but maybe not this one:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 Nov 2016, 13:51

The Simpsons, 16 years ago:

Simpsons predict Trump Presidency
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 04:07

We heard before we went to bed, but I still had a sleepless night.  When I woke about 3.20am, it took me ages to go back to sleep, distressed by the events of the night and what all this means for zenophobes everywhere and those who welcome immigrants, and wondering how Trump supporters will feel when he is not able to deliver on his promises.  "America great again, no crime, no illegal immigrants, hardly any Mexicans, etc."  How could a single woman [by that I mean any woman, not unmarried ones] vote for him? I am just seething thinking about it.

I don't really understand what it is about Hillary that the population dislikes so much.  It can't be that she's dishonest - our PM is not very honest and he is expecting and expected to win his fourth term in government.
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 04:52

I think it is because Hillary represents the old order and people wanted change, in a lot of cases Trump was a protest vote against 40 years of failed domestic policies. And she is more likely to go to war than Trump. I loathe Trump and everything he represents, but Hilary wouldn't have been much better either and I can't say I'm sorry to see the back of her.

The Democrats lost the election because they nominated Hillary, they probably would have won if they had listened and nominated another candidate not tainted like Hillary is. 

It was a horrible election campaign and it was a terrible choice to have to make either way, I'm glad it wasn't mine.
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 09:42

A lot of the "political correctness gone mad" brigade also trumped loudly in this election, much like in the UK a few months ago. I used to be an erstwhile member myself, until that is I took a look around at who was wading through the swamp with me towards the inevitable sinkhole at its centre (strangely where much of that PC chatter already emanates from).

I have now taken a wide detour round the quagmire and grace only the lofty airy peaks of sanity at its borders, from which one can view the activities below with a certain wryly amused detachment, especially when one sees that the inevitable war of diminishing brain cells will be fought out in the mire's epicentre. Some sterling efforts have been made by a few of them to roll their swamp up the mountain, and some fellow mountaineers up here with little faith in natural law watch with unjustified dread, but unless we all take pick axes and demolish our mountain retreat (as the normally sensible Germans did in times past) I reckon we're ok. For now at least the axes are sheathed and only the stench of muskeg gas prevails, agitated by all that thrashing around down there.

Enough mixing of metaphors now, I need to lie down (having checked I'm still securely tethered within my portaledge).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 10:12

@nordmann wrote:
 Enough mixing of metaphors now...


It was a fair old cocktail, nordmann.  Smile
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 10:40

And when I read nordmann's latest post, for a moment I even wondered if it was posted by me. He's clearly not himself... shock does that. So does port. I might have a brandy today.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 11:20

My aforesaid grip on sanity at the moment ...

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 12:27

And of course, dear old Ötzi, the first man we know of who took the lofty airy route when all around descended into madness ...



If I'm looking as good at his age I'll be pleased.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 12:44

Shit! I told you about the sinkhole and no one would listen!

Trump's only been president-elect one day and already Ripon in Yorkshire is disappearing down the man's plughole ...

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 Nov 2016, 22:08

@Islanddawn wrote:
I think it is because Hillary represents the old order and people wanted change, in a lot of cases Trump was a protest vote against 40 years of failed domestic policies. And she is more likely to go to war than Trump. I loathe Trump and everything he represents, but Hilary wouldn't have been much better either and I can't say I'm sorry to see the back of her.

The Democrats lost the election because they nominated Hillary, they probably would have won if they had listened and nominated another candidate not tainted like Hillary is. 

It was a horrible election campaign and it was a terrible choice to have to make either way, I'm glad it wasn't mine.


Islanddawn,

"I think it is because Hillary represents the old order and people wanted change, in a lot of cases Trump was a protest vote against 40 years of failed domestic policies."

There I think you mentioned the core of the phenomena. I saw yesterday a French documentary from the Mid West. And the guide was a Trump voter. Empty factories and one busy one, because it could work for the army and the army is obliged to take these inland factories as suppliers.
And as you say "people", white, black and yellow are in the same bath, the same situation and perhaps in rural country it is worser than in the cities.

Overhere in Belgium and Belgium is nearly one big city, you hear the same as about the big business going to the low wages countries and especially the assembling factories are closing and make many people redundant. Yes America again for the Americans.
And yes as in America, the same rancour against the migrants, political and economic migrants the same. And it is not political correct to say it, but its alive among the common man on the street. And yes the populists as the Vlaams blok in the Flanders region of Belgium say "Eigen volk eerst" (own people first). As a Geert Wilders in the Netherlands. As a Marina Le Pen in France.

I am on a French forum of geopolitcs and it is perhaps normal that the members are more focused on the French inland than on the geopolitics. And there I hear the same tones. They say the same lives overthere as about economy and migrants. And the bulk of the voters ask for change. And in Belgium they seems to me rather still quiet and enduring, perhaps because it is still not that bad.
And there is much mistrust to the banks too, as they wasted our money by pushing many greedy ones to risk their money and then fail. And some banks were to big to fall and they had to be saved by tax money from the citizens. A sign that the banks are not trusted anymore: although there is zero intrest on the savings, there is nevertheless a record of "savings only" in the banks. Some banks ask already money for holding your deposits even with zero intrest.
An yes I forgot even the famous Madame Merkel had to back down in the question of migrants in Germany...
And I think also that there are many parallels of the US vote with lately the Brexit vote. If London city at to chose against the Brexit for instance...

And if the established politics don't do what the common man asks, then is the way open for the populists...perhaps the next president in France next year will be Marina Le Pen. Lucky that they have there a second "tour" to adjust their vote and that there are more than two parties overthere and taht there are no "elector" men overthere...

And one can moan about all this as some female commentator overhere who said that politicians sometimes have to go against the will of the voters' public as for the common good...but in my opinion as that public are the voters, it is perhaps wise to listen what is living among the general public. But I agree, perhaps only superpowers can do that, as the little Belgium has perhaps not a big impact in that global...? Not sure if the whole European Union has an impact as we depends still that much from the US...?

Kind regards, Paul.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 12 Nov 2016, 13:44

Having just read through all your comments about sleepless nights and anxiety about the US elections ... I'm quite glad that I've had no internet connection since last Saturday night and so have blythely passed the week in complete ignorance.

For me no internet means no news ... I don't have a mobile phone (no coverage here), I rarely watch TV, and I only needed to go up to the village twice - firstly to do a weekly shop and then for the Armistice - and on neither occasion did world news impinge on more pressing matters of discussion, like Arnaud's new girlfriend, the lack of mushrooms this year, the best way to take rose cuttings, and a deep discussion all about sheep-shearing with the Monsieur le Mayor.

It was a bit of surprise to log on and read all the news this morning ..... though it is good to be back on-line and 'connected' again.
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Vizzer
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 13 Nov 2016, 00:36

Passing 4 days without knowing the result is pretty impressive though Meles. You've certainly trumped me on that. There was I feeling pleased with myself back in June for having nearly made it to lunchtime the next day without having found out the result of the UK's EU membership referendum. It had been a conscious decision on my part though - bed early the nite before, no radio or television or mobile switched on in the morning, no car radio on during the drive to the office. It's not that I wasn't interested - it was merely a sociological experiment. Looking at people's faces in the street as I drove passed, for example, told me ... absolutely nothing. It was only when a receptionist came to me later in the morning and said that David Cameron had resigned that I enquired further and after receiving a somewhat puzzled look, got the full story.

With regard to sleepless nites, then mycologists have been fretting about the decline of wild mushrooms for nearly 30 years now. One theory is that carbon monoxide from motor vehicles, aircraft and industry etc is to blame. No-one knows quite for sure. Whatever the cause, this year I haven't found a single Chanterelle or even a Penny Bun. There do seem to be plenty of Oysters and Stump Puffballs though. Maybe I should start cycling to work.

All of a sudden I fancy a pizza funghi e una bottiglia di birra.
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 13 Nov 2016, 04:09

@PaulRyckier wrote:
@Islanddawn wrote:
I think it is because Hillary represents the old order and people wanted change, in a lot of cases Trump was a protest vote against 40 years of failed domestic policies. And she is more likely to go to war than Trump. I loathe Trump and everything he represents, but Hilary wouldn't have been much better either and I can't say I'm sorry to see the back of her.

The Democrats lost the election because they nominated Hillary, they probably would have won if they had listened and nominated another candidate not tainted like Hillary is. 

It was a horrible election campaign and it was a terrible choice to have to make either way, I'm glad it wasn't mine.


Islanddawn,

"I think it is because Hillary represents the old order and people wanted change, in a lot of cases Trump was a protest vote against 40 years of failed domestic policies."

There I think you mentioned the core of the phenomena. I saw yesterday a French documentary from the Mid West. And the guide was a Trump voter. Empty factories and one busy one, because it could work for the army and the army is obliged to take these inland factories as suppliers.
And as you say "people", white, black and yellow are in the same bath, the same situation and perhaps in rural country it is worser than in the cities.

Overhere in Belgium and Belgium is nearly one big city, you hear the same as about the big business going to the low wages countries and especially the assembling factories are closing and make many people redundant. Yes America again for the Americans.
And yes as in America, the same rancour against the migrants, political and economic migrants the same. And it is not political correct to say it, but its alive among the common man on the street. And yes the populists as the Vlaams blok in the Flanders region of Belgium say "Eigen volk eerst" (own people first). As a Geert Wilders in the Netherlands. As a Marina Le Pen in France.

I am on a French forum of geopolitcs and it is perhaps normal that the members are more focused on the French inland than on the geopolitics. And there I hear the same tones. They say the same lives overthere as about economy and migrants. And the bulk of the voters ask for change. And in Belgium they seems to me rather still quiet and enduring, perhaps because it is still not that bad.
And there is much mistrust to the banks too, as they wasted our money by pushing many greedy ones to risk their money and then fail. And some banks were to big to fall and they had to be saved by tax money from the citizens. A sign that the banks are not trusted anymore: although there is zero intrest on the savings, there is nevertheless a record of "savings only" in the banks. Some banks ask already money for holding your deposits even with zero intrest.
An yes I forgot even the famous Madame Merkel had to back down in the question of migrants in Germany...
And I think also that there are many parallels of the US vote with lately the Brexit vote. If London city at to chose against the Brexit for instance...

And if the established politics don't do what the common man asks, then is the way open for the populists...perhaps the next president in France next year will be Marina Le Pen. Lucky that they have there a second "tour" to adjust their vote and that there are more than two parties overthere and taht there are no "elector" men overthere...

And one can moan about all this as some female commentator overhere who said that politicians sometimes have to go against the will of the voters' public as for the common good...but in my opinion as that public are the voters, it is perhaps wise to listen what is living among the general public. But I agree, perhaps only superpowers can do that, as the little Belgium has perhaps not a big impact in that global...? Not sure if the whole European Union has an impact as we depends still that much from the US...?

Kind regards, Paul.


Hi Paul,

Yes, tough times everywhere as there has always been periodically and the poor old immigrant (the other) is the first to get it in the neck. I despair at the stupidity of it, it seems that not much as changed and history lessons have not been learnt. De-industrialisation in most 'western countries' is partly our fault as well, we demand high wages, a big house, two cars in the garage and an overseas holiday every year and at the same time we demand cheap products in the shops all of which drives businesses away to countries where production will be cheaper. We demand that governments give us growth, growth, growth ad infinitum without considering the consequences. So we make the rod for our own backs and then blame it on immigrants or in the Uk's case the EU too? Sigh.

As for referendums, many seem unaware that they are only glorified opinion polls and are never binding on parliaments. For some reason they are confused with elections when they are not the same thing at all. As we learnt in Greece last year, governments will do want they think is best in the long run, not 'the people' who usually don't know their arses from their elbows outside our own square metre of existance.

Anyway, too early in the morning for such seriousness. I'm in need of another coffee......
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 13 Nov 2016, 11:41

ID wrote:
As for referendums, many seem unaware that they are only glorified opinion polls and are never binding on parliaments.

Never say never. Constitutional referendums, by definition, are binding on parliaments. Of course to have a constitutional referendum one first needs an actual constitution and not some vague use of the term with "unwritten" lumped into the same sentence. An unwritten constitution, as Sam Goldwyn might have said, isn't worth the paper it's written on.

We are about to see in some graphic detail, I reckon sooner rather than later, just how effective that slight addition of ink and paper can be.

But just to demonstrate how Australians (who have a written constitution and are no strangers to referendums, binding or not) regard the principle of devolved authority from the people as having one's constitutional cake and eating it, there is this from Maggie Beer (don't all rush out shotgun in hand on a wild quandong hunt - they're not in season right now):



Constitutional Cake
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ferval
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 13 Nov 2016, 13:32

Caro, I hope you and yours have not been affected by today's 'quake or the aftermath. Please let us know (when practical and not an inconvenience of course) that you are all OK.
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 14 Nov 2016, 02:27

I don't live in a (touch wood!) earthquake-prone part of the country.  But Christchurch people didn't think they did either.  The far north and the far south-east don't seem to get earthquakes much, though the area round Auckland does have volcanoes which may erupt. 

Anyway we didn't feel a thing, though the news this morning said Geonet had reports of it being felt from Invercargill, more or less in line with where I live, to Whangarei right up north.  I have nephews and nieces in Christchurch, not far from where this one was centred, though I think not connected to them, and as far as I know they are all fine. My sister has a nice little holiday home near where there was a lot of damage, and hopes her glassware isn't lying on a heap on the floor surrounded by broken bottles of Worchestershire sauce. It seems Wellington suffered quite a lot of collateral damage, though we might just have heard a lot about that from the National Radio, whose presenters are from there (and Auckland).

Down here 4 kms from where I live people were evacuated from the settlement at the seashore because of the risk of a tsunami, and brought into the community centre in my township for the night.  About 50 people, I gather.
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