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 Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside

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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 13:48

The arrival of the railways and increasing leisure time among the working populations of Britain's major cities led to the traditional summer holiday spent at resorts on the coast.
"Wake Weeks", when the machinery in the Lancashire cotton mills was closed down for annual maintenance, saw thousands of mill workers descend on places like Blackpool and Southport, which became major holiday venues. Blackpool's population mushroomed from 14,000 in 1881 to 47,000 in 1901.

colourised photo of Blackpool in 1898;

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 14:00

An unhappy holiday experience in his youth, when he was locked out of his digs by his landlady all day and left to wander about aimlessly, caused Billy Butlin to open the first of his holiday camps at Skegness in 1936. In these facilities, there was always something to do. The cost worked out at roughly one weeks' wages for one weeks' holiday, making Butlins camps very affordable and very popular.


Butlins advert:


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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 14:15

No visit to the seaside would be complete with fish & chips and/or ice cream.
Nardini's art décor café originally built in 1935, on Largs seafront. There was a large influx of Italians into the UK  in the 1890s who established themselves in the catering industry;

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 14:22

The seaside holiday reached its' peak in the 1940s &50s;

A packed Margate Beach sometime in the 50s;



Aberdeen Beach post war. The concrete anti-invasion obstacles from WW2 are still in place.

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 14:41

The 1930s saw a boom in outdoor swimming pools, no less than 169 of these, Lidos, were built across the UK (not just at the seaside) by various local authorities. The Jubilee Pool (1935) in Penzance had an unusual triangular layout.

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 14:47

"Going  doon the watter for the Fair"

Clyde holidays


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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 14:59

The most northerly Lido in the UK is the seawater pool at Stonehaven ( 1934). This pool is heated ( it would need to be!!!) and has survived to the present day;
photo from the 1940s
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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 15:09

Knobbly Knees contest at Butlins. The "Redcoats", as the Butlins staff were known, was often a starting point for many entertainers, Dave Allen and Des O'Connor were among those began their careers at Butlins.

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 15:14

Triceratops wrote:
No visit to the seaside would be complete with fish & chips and/or ice cream.

There was a large influx of Italians into the UK in the 1890s who established themselves in the catering industry;

There had been another large influx of Italians to London in the 1850s at about the time that large quantities of ice started to be imported from North America, particularly by the Wentham Lake Ice Company. Quick to catch at an opportunity and often lacking the initial finance to buy business premises, many of these Italian immigrants set up small businesses selling hard, gaudily coloured ices known as "penny licks" (often made with not the freshest milk and bulked out with corn starch) in the streets from hand-carts. They announced their wares with cries of "ecco un poco!", ensuring their nickname of Hokey Pokey men ... and so the ice cream van was born.
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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Fri 24 Jun 2016, 15:24

"Hokey Pokey", haven't heard that expression in years !!!!! thanks Meles.

This is an American import, inspired by Coney Island. The Scenic Railway roller coaster opened at Margate in 1920. Photo from the 1930s;

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Sun 04 Jun 2017, 18:49

A book called Images of the Past, the British Seaside by Lucinda Gosling has been published this year. A preview of some of the great photographs in it can be seen here:

Seaside holidaymakers in Britain
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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Sun 04 Jun 2017, 22:35

Vizzer,

I tried to find photos of the 19th century Belgian coast, but I didn't find anything substantial.
Only this:
http://www.vub.ac.be/C-HIM/attachments/papers/davy_depelchin.pdf
Then I tried with the most important ones of the 19th century:
Ostend
https://www.loc.gov/photos/?fa=location%3Abelgium%7Clocation%3Aostend&sb=title_s
De Haan
goo.gl/KtE65R

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Mon 05 Jun 2017, 10:14

I cannot remember ever seeing one of these:



perhaps there was, but I've forgotten.
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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Mon 05 Jun 2017, 11:04

One the other hand, I do remember seeing donkeys on the beach.

This photo is of donkeys on the beach at Schevingen, Netherlands:

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Mon 05 Jun 2017, 11:33

I remember Punch & Judy from family holidays but I can't say it ever appealed to me even as a child.

The uniquely French form of this sort of entertainment, Guignol, still seems very popular judging by the various posters that appear in all resort towns here in summer. I believe, though I've never actually seen a performance, that Guignol has less slapstick and more biting satire than does Punch and Judy, and is aimed at adults as much as at children (perhaps in the same way as good Christmas pantomime comedy operates on several levels and simultaneously appeals to a wide age-range). In fact I think there are often special evening performances specifically tailored to predominantly adult audiences, which in their humour are probably more akin to TV's 'Spitting Image'-type satire of the 1980s (indeed a similar program still regularly airs on French TV, and is called 'Les Guignols').

Guignol was the creation of Laurent Mourguet an illiterate silk weaver from Lyon. During the French Revolution the silk industry largely collapsed and Mourguet lost his job. To support his family he became a peddler and then took up dentistry (as you do) becoming an itinerant tooth-puller. The service was free: he made his money from selling snake-oil medicines afterward to ease the pain. To attract patients he started setting up a puppet show in front of his dentist's chair featuring 'Polichinelle', the traditional Italian 'Punch' character. His strategy worked well and eventually he gave up dentistry altogether to become a professional puppeteer, creating his own scenarios drawing on the concerns of his working-class audience and improvising references to the news of the day. He developed characters closer to the daily lives of his Lyon audience: Guignol himself; Guignol's wife Madelon; Gnafron, a wine-loving cobbler; and the gendarme, Flageolet ... plus a variety of other topical characters often based on real and well-known people.

Although nominally a silkweaver like much of his original audience, Guignol's profession changes as does his marital status: he can be in turn valet, peddler, carpenter, shoemaker, or unemployed; and at times he is Madelon's husband but at others her smitten suitor, according to requirements of the scenario. What remain constant are his poverty, but more importantly his good humor and his sense of justice. In modern French "guignol" is generally an insult meaning "buffoon", but actually Guignol is clever, courageous and generous, and his inevitable victory is always the triumph of good over evil.

Flageolet (the gendarme), Guignol, et Gnafon (the alcoholic cobbler):

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PostSubject: Re: Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside   Mon 05 Jun 2017, 20:59

Triceratops wrote:
One the other hand, I do remember seeing donkeys on the beach.

This photo is of donkeys on the beach at Schevingen, Netherlands:



Triceratops and what about the fishermen on horseback of the Belgian coast?





Kind regards from Paul.
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