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 Slogans and Catch Phrases

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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Sun 27 Aug 2017, 15:40

Irritating as these soon become there are several that are markers in my memory. The death of Sir Brucy - who milked his to discomfort - is a reminder of how these seep into language, some to live and most to fade. Yet slogans and catch phrases also weave through a given time frame as holding bands of ivied memory. 

'Can I do yer now, sir?' from ITMA is my earliest and summons up radio blaring whilst sat at a late of war time fare - often rabbit stew. The show had many others..... the colonel- sot who put in 'I don't mind if I do,' whenever any dialogue mentioned having another of anything.

From many radio shows .... the Goons had several........ thence to TV shows. As I recalll the impressive Peggy Mountford as Union leader in the Rag Trade's "Everybody Out!" actually induced courage in the workforce outside to actually do similar.

Most fade in time and I suspect there are slogans used in historical times that ran their course. So, Res Hist - remains of - any to contribute? 

Ta Ta for now, P (quote Itma again- and a grandmother using it.)
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Sun 27 Aug 2017, 17:09

Wasn't Paddy in the Rag Trade played by Miriam Karlin...both she and Sheila Hancock went on to be considered as "serious" actresses. Bill Shakespeare's given us a few hasn't he? http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/news/william-shakespeares-450th-birthday-50-everyday-phrases-that-came-from-the-bard-9275254.html "It was all Greek to me" is one that comes to me fairly readily.

A couple that I found particularly irritating (possibly because my younger brother did imitations of them in the mistaken belief he was being funny) were Norman Vaughan with "Roses grow on you" and "Swinging, dodgy Elsie Tanner". Catherine Tate's "How very dare you" was in quite regular usage relatively recently.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Sun 27 Aug 2017, 17:12

I'm sure I've read somewhere that the Elizabethan comic actor, Robert Armin, had a catch phrase: "Anon, sir, at once sir..."

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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Sun 27 Aug 2017, 23:02

Addendum to my earlier post - I see that Priscilla referenced Sir Brucy and of course Norman Vaughan took on the Palladium job post-Sir Bruce. I had forgotten there used to be a kids' rhyme "Swinging dodgy Elsie Tanner, Albert Tatlock lost a spanner".* High art it may not be but I did find that while watching "Game of Thrones" I wanted to know what happened next and sometimes in winter months when I've wanted to get home before it got too dark I've said something to the effect of wanting to get home because "the night is dark and full of terrors" - which is a phrase spoken more than once by Melisandre, a character in the show.

* Characters in the soap opera "Coronation Street" in the 1960s.
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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Mon 28 Aug 2017, 09:49

One of the simplest and most effective slogans of the 20th century:



1952 Presidential Election
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Mon 28 Aug 2017, 13:43

Wiki:

The word slogan is derived from slogorn which was an Anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic and Irish sluagh-ghairm (sluagh "army", "host" + gairm "cry"). Slogans vary from the written and the visual to the chanted and the vulgar. Their simple rhetorical nature usually leaves little room for detail and a chanted slogan may serve more as social expression of unified purpose than as communication to an intended audience.

George E. Shankel's (1941, as cited in Denton Jr., 1980) research states that, "English-speaking people began using the term by 1704." The term at that time meant "the distinctive note, phrase or cry of any person or body of persons." Slogans were common throughout the European continent during the Middle Ages; they were used primarily as passwords to ensure proper recognition of individuals at night or in the confusion of battle.
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Vizzer
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Tue 05 Sep 2017, 21:55

There are quite a few slogans from public health campaigns etc. One of the most famous was:

'Coughs and Sneezes spread diseases (catch them in your handkerchief!)'

This dates from the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 and was periodically revived in subsequent decades. There hasn't been an outbreak of its like since so maybe it really did change human behaviour for the better.

From the 1970s we got:

'Clunk Click Every Trip'

This was to encourage the use of the car seat belts in the years before they became compulsory. It’s subsequently fallen out of fashion, however, because of its close association with James Savile.

One I remember from my time in Hong Kong was:

'Mosquitoes breed in standing water
Be aware - give them no quarter
Clear stagnant drains after the rains
And help protect your son and daughter'

What struck me about this was that it is in English when the overwhelming majority of Hong Kongers are Cantonese speaking. This led me to suspect that it was borrowed from elsewhere in the British Empire or even beyond – Singapore or Queensland or Calcutta or Florida perhaps. Does anyone know?
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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Tue 05 Sep 2017, 23:05

Perhaps slogans appear to bear more weight if written in English. On one central strip in a major subcontinental  thoroughfare I recall a spate of slogans on huge cement signs....'Take Long walks' was one to which was added by a local wag - surely not an expat .... 'Off short planks.' Then there was 'Eat more Vegetables' to which was then added 'And keep your bowels moving.'  Still there when last I passed but the paint ed remarks had eventually been whitewashed out.

Here I recall one here about going to work on an egg. Then eggs became bad for you but now they are better - or they were last week. That may have changed, of course. As a child, I delighted in Chad  - a spook with nose over the wall - who drew attention to deficiencies... 'Wot no butter? was one I recall. At the time I never quite understood 'Dig for Victory.' posters. Hearty head scarfed girls with spades were trying to bury Hitler was my interpretation....... grasping wrong end of sticks started early for me.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 08:51

"Go to work on an egg", mentioned above by Priscilla, became one of the most famous slogans in British advertising history. It was dreamed up by director Len Fulford, although writer Fay Weldon has also been given credit for it.

Fulford became known as "the egg man" and this epithet found its way into the lyrics of the Lennon song I Am the Walrus:

I am the egg man; they are the egg men;
I am the walrus - goo, goo, goo job
(sp.?)...

A new slant on an old chocolate bar slogan that most of here grew up with - "Have a break - have a KitKat" -  cropped up on the internet only this week. Following the announcement from Kensington Palace that HRH the Duchess of Cambridge is expecting her third child, some wag posted: "Have a break - have a Kid, Kate."





But "Everyone's a Fruit and Nut case" was the cleverest slogan, although Tchaikovsky's Danse des Mirlitons has never been the same since, Bit like the music to "Just One Cornetto - give it to me"...
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 09:00

This became a famous political slogan in the late 1970s: it was on billboards everywhere.








Its impact was dramatic, both for the power of the message and for the novelty – for such political billboard adverts were still new to British politics in the late 1970. Its impact was helped along by the Labour Chancellor, Denis Healey, denouncing it in Parliament. As so often with political adverts, a little bit of controversy made the message go a long way...
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 09:25

Visually and for its "little bit of controversy", there are echoes of the "Labour isn't working" poster in the fairly recent UKIP "Breaking Point - The EU has failed us" poster, no?



I wonder which, if any, of the current brexit slogans/phrases will be remembered: "strong and stable", "brexit is brexit", "red, white and blue brexit", "have our cake and eat it", "go whistle" ... ? Some of these are of course just one-off phrases spoken spontaneously by politicians, but then historically politician's odd utterances have, often taken out of context, become firmly associated with their originator ... like Margaret Thatcher's, "there is no such thing as society" and "this lady's not for turning", Denis Healey's "what a silly billy", or Harold Macmillan's "you've never had it so good" .... or going back way further, Gladstone's "my mission is to pacify Ireland" (an off-the-cuff comment to a journalist that was repeatedly quoted back at him when he susequently failed to do so).
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 11:45

Would SPQR be considered a slogan? I think it could and it's one that's been around for over two millennia.






Not nearly as venerable but old enough for me to remember my grandfather quoting is:






I remember this one, it was outside the old, now demolished, St Enoch's railway station in Glasgow.


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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 11:57

This was quite a common phrase in the 60s. The slogan itself originated in the 1930s:



from the Whisky Magazine:

For those of us of a certain age, the phrase “Don't be vague ask for Haig” remains instantly familiar, despite the fact that the once ubiquitous Haig Gold Label blend in its dark brown bottle with contrasting white and gold label is now the province of specialist retailers in the UK. The strapline was the work of Thomas Henry Egan who reputedly received £25 and a case of whisky from the distillers for his efforts.

It is worth noting that by 1939 Gold Label had become the biggest seller in the Distiller's Company Ltd (DCL) stable, and from the 1930s to the 1970s the Haig brand was Scotland's leading whisky.
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 12:10


This is actually true:

Guiness is good for you
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 13:05

Another dubious advertising claim was,

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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 13:13

A Mars a day makes you fat and spotty.


I once saw a sign outside a pub with an image showing five pints of Guinness. Underneath was the famous slogan: "Have you had your 5 a day?"



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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 14:56

"The Buck stops here" sign on President Harry Truman's desk;

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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Wed 06 Sep 2017, 16:32

"Out of the strong came forth sweetness", the slogan on the logo of Tate & Lyle's treacle and golden syrup:

    

Famously the design of the tins hasn't changed since they were first sold in the 1880s, with on the front the drawing of a dead lion and a swarm of bees. Abram Lyle was a very pious man and used the story of Samson in the Old Testament as the inspiration for the design. Quite a while before his fateful haircut, Samson got attacked by a lion which, through His power, Samson was able to rip open with his bare hands, killing it. Later he saw that bees had built a hive within its carcass and he took some honey to his family and friends and they had a feast. He didn’t tell them about the lion and had them guess how he came about all the honey, presenting them with the poser:

And he said unto them, Out of the eater came forth meat, and out of the strong came forth sweetness. And they could not in three days expound the riddle.
Judges 14:14

Although strictly speaking it is wasps rather than honey-bees that are attracted by carrion.
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Thu 07 Sep 2017, 23:05

Priscilla,

I see I am a bit taken in the sprint (the sprint to contribute on the subject Wink )...
But I was not lucky in my research...
First I divided the subject in two categories: the political ones and the advertisement ones (although both are perhaps the same Wink )
I started with the political ones. And from the series that had a big impact, that I read about, I selected unfortunately these five ones:
Better dead than red.
One man, one vote.
Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Führer. (one folk, one state, one leader)
Liberté, égalité, fraternité (liberty, egality, fraternity)(copied by Pétain with: Famille, travail, patrie (family, work, homeland))
Eigen volk eerst. (own people first)

Even with "better dead than red" I came with the satire "Better dead than red" in a street without end, but obstinately I searched further...



I knew that it was a satire, but as always I sought for the source, the about us...an there it started...nearly two hours on the internet...
What I at least found:
http://ourstage.com/profile/brianclarke/songs
But about "my" Brian Clarke nothing, but more than ten "others"
I guess it is an American, while in the film played a certain Audrey Dundeee Hannah ans she is American
http://www.lacasting.com/resume/resumeprint.asp?rs=1&crypt=dicgliaifpggfglfgbdhdkgalggblgehmiahhaojkmkfbeph
"Better dead than red" "co-star" Brian Clarke, Jerkstore Films"
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3425473/bio?ref_=nmbio_ql_1

And "Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Führer" was even worser... Wink

Yes, if I don't find something I can become berserk...and if my mind (Temperance Wink ) not argues with my desires I am obstinately lost...

Kind regards Priscilla from Paul.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Fri 08 Sep 2017, 12:41

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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Fri 08 Sep 2017, 13:58

You'll wonder where the yellow went when you brush your teeth with Pepsodent:

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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Fri 22 Sep 2017, 18:30

Today I used the phrase 'Ooo missus!' Where did that come from, I wonder? Frankie Howard? Ken Dodd?  Probably from radio history because I was abroad when these sort of things came on TV.
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Sat 23 Sep 2017, 03:22

I can think of two off the top of my head: the political ad for the National Party known as the Dancing Cossacks. Called the most infamous electioneer ad in NZ it featured people dressed as Cossacks dancing across the screen.  https://nzhistory.govt.nz/media/video/dancing-cossacks

For straight ads there was the "bugger" ad; an advertisement for Toyota utes featuring two famous NZ broadcasters having as series of mishaps in their truck going over rough ground.  At each one they say 'bugger'.  It ends with their sheepdog getting splashed with mud and also saying 'bugger'.  https://www.nzonscreen.com/title/bugger-toyota-hilux-commercial-1999
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Tue 26 Sep 2017, 11:10

The Guardian: From Homer Simpson to Hank Kingsley: TV's greatest catchphrases ranked:

The perfect soundbite can make a great show iconic. Here are the very best.

Iconic? ... I haven't heard, or at least don't remember, about half of them! The comments below the article however give lots of others.
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Tue 26 Sep 2017, 11:21

I must agree with MM, about the only one - the onliest one - I've heard was 'Live long and prosper', as a nephew of mine once lent me a box of Star Trek.

This probaly tells more of my telly watching skills than anything else.
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PostSubject: Re: Slogans and Catch Phrases   Tue 26 Sep 2017, 20:28

Meles meles wrote:
The Guardian: From Homer Simpson to Hank Kingsley: TV's greatest catchphrases ranked:

The perfect soundbite can make a great show iconic. Here are the very best.

Iconic? ... I haven't heard, or at least don't remember, about half of them! The comments below the article however give lots of others.


Meles meles,

I only remember that from the Flintstones (from before my twenties) and the others...not all Anglo-Saxon stuff came over the Channel...

Kind regards, Paul.
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