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 Historical TV and Radio.

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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 24 Oct 2017, 22:45

That's seems very interesting Ferval.

I did already research overhere in a thread, if I recall it well, "Kings and Gods" and also for Zoroasterianism and the Cathars (albigenses). And on the old Beeb for the copmparison between Christianism and Zoroastrianism...
I am looking forward for it. And yes the audio can we receive here in Belgium not the visual...

Thank you for mentioning it, while here I look only to ARTE or to the BBC if something interesting is announced.

Kind regards from Paul.
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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 25 Oct 2017, 09:43

This is being shown on Saturday nights on BBC 1:



fairly odd for BBC to show a major drama production on a Saturday. By 9pm, an alcohol induced haze means the most I can cope with is the football.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 25 Oct 2017, 10:36

Gunpowder is, apparently very gruesome - with crushings, beheadings and disembowlings being shown in all their g(l)ory - and has been criticised as being unnecessarily and gratuitously violent.

Yes, Gunpowder is brutal and sickening. Just like 17th-century Britain
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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 27 Oct 2017, 11:30

Starting tonight on Channel 5;

8 days that made Rome

First episode is about the Battle of Zama.

Looks like there may be a load of dodgy reconstructions:

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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 08 Feb 2018, 12:24

On BBC1 from Saturday 17th February:

Troy
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 14:37

A new five-part history of Britain begins tomorrow:

Cunk on Britain 10.00pm BBC2.

Cunk examines the history of these islands from earliest times to Brexit.  ("Now we've got our country back, what the hell are we going to do with it?" - a good question.) She interviews famous historians - all of whom seem a little bemused - and, as ever, asks those questions we have all pondered in our hearts, but have been too afraid to ask, even here, for fear of being thought completely stupid.

Cunk also considers "landmarks" like the Bayeux Tapestry: "just like being there, but in wool".



Last edited by Temperance on Mon 02 Apr 2018, 16:54; edited 1 time in total
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 14:45

@Triceratops wrote:
On BBC1 from Saturday 17th February:

Troy


Wasn't it utter crap? Who on earth wrote the dialogue?

“How did you two get together, then?” Paris asked Menelaus about his relationship with Helen, as if he'd just strolled into the Love Island villa Shocked - more Homer Simpson than the other one, I think.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 15:03

Oh, I'll give that one a miss then Temperance.  The Rome cosplay that Trike mentions from last autumn (and which somehow bypassed me) sounds fun in a not to be taken too seriously way, though.  Mind you, I haven't seen it and can't really judge.  It may have been very hifalutin'.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 15:22

I like a nice bit of hifalutin' myself - makes me a bit of a bore, I know, but there you have it. I phoned a friend last night, all excited about the BBC Easter Saturday presentation of Andrew Scott's Hamlet - which was absolutely brilliant. The bedroom scene with Gertrude was especially well done - sort of Jeremy Kyle meets Sophocles, but it worked a treat, if a bit of a harrowing treat. My friend replied no, they had not watched it, and were not intending to - Paddington Bear 2 was their evening's entertainment this Easter.

That shut me up.


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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 03 Apr 2018, 12:56

It's possible the Hamlet that was shown on the Beeb over the Easter break may still be on iplayer, Temperance, so I may still be able to catch it.  I mentioned on another thread that I saw the National Theatre's (well from the Bridge at the National Theatre) Julius Caesar on 22nd March as a belated birthday present to myself.  Well, I didn't see it in real life, I saw a broadcast version beamed to my local theatre.  I enjoyed it though - they had a female Cassius, Casca and Decius Brutus (modern dress).  Michelle Fairley who played Caitlyn (sp) Stark in GoT played Cassius.  I don't watch The Walking Dead - even this old trout has to have some standards - but David Morrissey who played the Governor in that show played Mark Antony (as in ancient Roman not as in hip-hop artist).  I did become somewhat lazy - i.e. watching things for entertainment on iplayer/YouTube rather than for learning (though the two can overlap) when I was convalescing though I don't have that excuse any more.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 08 Apr 2018, 08:48

Do try to catch up on Hamlet, LiR - it's better than Paddington Bear 2 - honest. Andrew Scott is the best Hamlet I've seen, I think - far better than Sherlock Holmes was in the same role.

I must be getting very old because Philomena Cunk's programme was not as funny as I had hoped, although it was good in places. The utter bewilderment of that lady from Oxford, Dr Laura Ashe, Associate Professor of Medieval Literature, as she tried to cope with Philomena's extremely embarrassing questions about King Arthur  ("King Arthur came a lot, didn't he?") seemed genuine; and Robert Peston (Political Editor of ITV News) did take seriously PC's question: "What's the most political thing that has ever happened in Britain then?" An interesting question - would perhaps make a good thread. I think Peston nearly a week later is probably still trying to formulate a reply.

The Telegraph gave the first programme (five in series) five stars which seems very generous.

I think it's the Tudors this coming Tuesday...
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 12 Apr 2018, 15:47

MM (on another thread) wrote:
 



Only I've never found anything that Philomena Cunk presents as remotely funny.



Wow - what a put-down! Philomena is my heroine - the thinking person's idiot. I love her and the way she takes the p*ss out of the educated BBC elite. Sort of Bolton's revenge on Jeremy Paxman and his mates.

Tuesday's episode was much better than episode one. Her summary of Elizabeth I's religious policy was not without merit, I thought: "Elizabeth I allowed her subjects to practise whatever religion they liked, as long as they pretended to be C of E when asked - a bit like middle-class people do when they want their kids to go to a posh school."

Professor Ashley Jackson (Imperial and Military History at King's College, London) actually seemed to intimidate Philomena. She wouldn't mess about too much in his class. No embarrassing questions about King Arthur's ejaculatory prowess for this historian - just a quizzing about Sir Walter and root vegetables. I'm sorry, MM - I obviously have a puerile sense of humour - but when she asked Jackson: "When Sir Walter Raleigh first saw potatoes, was he scared?"  I really did laugh.

Jackson, quite unfazed, gave her a stern look and told her: "I think that when Sir Walter Raleigh first saw potatoes - not that we have any documentary records of the moment when he first beheld a potato or a field of potatoes - I do not believe he was scared: this was a buccaneering character and I think he was able to take on - erm, erm - his emotions when engaging with potatoes at first sight."

Philomena seemed pleased with his response; she nodded and looked impressed.

I also liked her comment about the Gunpowder Plotters. It is no wonder they all got caught as the artist of the famous image shown below stupidly put all their names on the picture. Which was, when you think about it, a pretty dumb thing to do.






She's not as daft as she looks. I'll check out what Philomena told the Guardian about the advantages of being stupid. I remember I posted it ages ago on Saint Paul's thread.


EDIT: Here is what I posted:

I wrote:


One last thing - just for the record. Diane Morgan, the creator of our much-loved Philomena, said in an interview for the Guardian: “It’s like wearing a suit of armour. If you’re Cunk, nothing can hurt you."

Not a learned comment about Saint Paul, I'm afraid, but nevertheless there is wisdom in Morgan's remark. Stupidity has its uses.

It does indeed, especially when people are trying to hurt you.
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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 13 Apr 2018, 16:56

Oh MM, so sorry you do not find Clunk amusing - it's embarrassing in its humour because so much of her stuff is the sort of thing that onee has heard or seen - especially as a teacher. At fountains Abbey I was asked why people had built ruins, from exam answer sheets I found out that some one thought William Wordsworth wrote Romeo and Daffodil, that Everest was first climbed by HIllary somebody and sherpa Ruyard Kipling and on and on. What ever had I been paid for? You may well ask. And it is from the questions at the end of what you though was a pretty good lesson  that make you realise it wasn't perfect by a long mark. I think the experts handle it quite well keeping face, voice and demeanor calm - I couldn't always quite do that having a very low humour threshold.

Cunk facing the experts - rather like me confronting nord on logic - makes one squirm because it really is the sort of thing that happens........ ask any National trust room sitter what is the daftest question they have been asked; this makes their day to relate.

Of Cunk, I doubt I will ever think of this Tudor event again other than the time when That Spanish woman Amanda took the  ships to attack Elizabeth One and who Drake beat when he had finished playing with his balls. 

I wondered what my more serious husband would make of it - and noted him smiling throughout the last silly episode. I do hope she does philosophy................
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