A discussion forum for history enthusiasts everywhere
 
HomeHome  Recent ActivityRecent Activity  FAQFAQ  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  

Share | 
 

 All one big happy Erectus family

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
nordmann
Nobiles Barbariæ
avatar

Posts : 5598
Join date : 2011-12-25

PostSubject: All one big happy Erectus family   Thu 17 Oct 2013, 21:02

Anthropologists working with the recently discovered remains of a 1.8 million year old human have begun reaching some startling conclusions regarding the diversity of the human form at that point in our evolution. What have been hitherto presumed to have been separate human species now appear to actually have been simply very different but completely contemporary members of the one species, Homo Erectus. This video from The Guardian introduces the topic:






A link to the full article can be found here:

Homo Erectus - find challenges traditional evolutionary theory
Back to top Go down
https://reshistorica.historyboard.net
ferval
Censura
avatar

Posts : 2421
Join date : 2011-12-27

PostSubject: Re: All one big happy Erectus family   Fri 18 Oct 2013, 00:13

That should start a right good stair heid rammy amongst the paleo-anthropologists, they're an argumentative and vitriolic bunch. The Johanson-Leaky feud over Lucy's family was a doozy. A lot of territories will now be defended with the vigour of bull elephant seals.
Talking of Johanson, didn't he originally think that the Hadar au. africanus specimens were different species until he was persuaded that the differences were due to sexual dimorphism?

I've had a look at the Science article and the argument seems persuasive, at least to one who isn't au fait with the a lot of it; there's another more detailed illustration of the 5 skulls drawn from different aspects and the variety of size, shape, jaw robustity and brain case size is striking. The main problem in deciding whether or not these and the African homos are all of the same species, I suppose, is the paucity of examples of, say, h. rudolfensis which does, it must be said, look very different to the Dmanisi skulls. Maybe he ran into a rock face while getting away from a big cat.

Whoever is right, I wouldn't want to argue with no 5, he's a scary looking dude.
Back to top Go down
PaulRyckier
Censura
avatar

Posts : 1440
Join date : 2012-01-01
Location : Belgium

PostSubject: Re: All one big happy Erectus family   Fri 18 Oct 2013, 20:42

@ferval wrote:
That should start a right good stair heid rammy amongst the paleo-anthropologists, they're an argumentative and vitriolic bunch. The Johanson-Leaky feud over Lucy's family was a doozy. A lot of territories will now be defended with the vigour of bull elephant seals.
Talking of Johanson, didn't he originally think that the Hadar au. africanus specimens were different species until he was persuaded that the differences were due to sexual dimorphism?

I've had a look at the Science article and the argument seems persuasive, at least to one who isn't au fait with the a lot of it; there's another more detailed illustration of the 5 skulls drawn from different aspects and the variety of size, shape, jaw robustity and brain case size is striking. The main problem in deciding whether or not these and the African homos are all of the same species, I suppose, is the paucity of examples of, say, h. rudolfensis which does, it must be said, look very different to the Dmanisi skulls. Maybe he ran into a rock face while getting away from a big cat.

Whoever is right, I wouldn't want to argue with no 5, he's a scary looking dude.
 
Yes, Ferval, some different thoughts from different sides...
Saw this evening on the BBC world site:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24564375

And yes Temperance, I too see a hallo around the name of our most distinguished leader...

Kind regards and with esteem to both,

Paul.
Back to top Go down
Gilgamesh of Uruk
Censura
avatar

Posts : 1399
Join date : 2011-12-27

PostSubject: Re: All one big happy Erectus family   Fri 18 Oct 2013, 22:45

Paelontologists are divided into two species, "lumpers" who regard all contemporary fossils as being of one species, and "splitters" who will postulate a new species (especially if they have discovered it) for any new discovery which isn't virtually identical to existing ones. Professoris dmanisianus is obvously a representative of the "lumper" tendency.
Back to top Go down
Triceratops
Censura
avatar

Posts : 2810
Join date : 2012-01-05

PostSubject: Re: All one big happy Erectus family   Thu 05 Mar 2015, 11:53

Discovery of a jaw bone in Ethiopia has pushed the date for the earliest human back by 400,000 years;


http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/mar/04/jaw-bone-discovery-in-ethiopia-is-oldest-ever-human-lineage-remains
Back to top Go down
Gilgamesh of Uruk
Censura
avatar

Posts : 1399
Join date : 2011-12-27

PostSubject: Re: All one big happy Erectus family   Thu 05 Mar 2015, 16:03

@Triceratops wrote:
Discovery of a jaw bone in Ethiopia has pushed the date for the earliest human back by 400,000 years;


http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/mar/04/jaw-bone-discovery-in-ethiopia-is-oldest-ever-human-lineage-remains
For a given value of the term "human" - I don't reckon that one is "Homo", rather another Australopithecine - possibly a new species, more likely just an early member of one of the known ones.
Back to top Go down
 

All one big happy Erectus family

View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Res Historica History Forum :: The history of people ... :: Civilisation and Community-