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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 25 Jan 2017, 14:40

25th January is Burns' Night; Tam o' Shanter as expressed in the paintings of Alexander Goudie:

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 25 Jan 2017, 23:57

On January 25, 1858, the Wedding March by Felix Mendelssohn was played at the marriage of Princess Victoria of Great Britain and Prince Friedrich of Prussia. Victoria was the daughter of Queen Victoria.

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 26 Jan 2017, 10:04

January 26th, 1808. Captain William Bligh is "arrested" by mutineering officers and deposed. At first the mutineers are fended off by Miss Mary Bligh, William's daughter, who wields a doughty parasol in her father's defence, but having overcome this formidable obstacle they then ransack Bligh's quarters. Finding him hiding under a servant's bed they haul him out, place him in manacles, and lead him to an impromptu brig, a hastily secured gardener's tool shed.

If this all sounds very un-nautical and non-Bountyish it's because it has nothing to do with that incident whatsoever. If to be deposed in one mutiny could be deemed unfortunate, to find oneself yet again at the receiving end of disgruntled underlings intent on your violent deposition must be regarded - to paraphrase Oscar - as remiss in the extreme. But yet this was the fate that befell Captain Bligh when, as recently appointed governor of the New South Wales penal colony, he found himself the target yet again of a mutiny (in his time he was in fact the target of at least four mutinies, so remissful was he apparently).

This time the mutineers were not naval officers but members of a military "grandee" class that had emerged in the nascent Australian state and who had grown indistinguishable from (and were in close cahoots with) a landed gentry, Australian style, which was increasingly resentful and suspicious of crown appointed governance, especially governors who - like Bligh - actually took measures to prevent the increasingly vast profits generated from an indentured labour class falling into the pockets of a select few. Fifty years later a Quaker temperance historian, seeking examples of the evils of alcohol in society, seized on the fact that the mutineers in 1808 had specified sale of rum profits in particular as something the British shouldn't expect a divvy from. Bligh had later exaggerated this further, saying their preoccupation with this product obviously meant they were fuelled by it too. William Howitt, the Quaker, recorded it therefore as "The Rum Rebellion" and it is this name that has stuck, though in truth the real issues ran much deeper. Bligh had, in his typically disciplinarian and authoritarian manner, attempted to redefine what passed as citizen status within the colony, thereby broadening the tax base to include the bulk of its denizens, and removing the self-appointed local "aristocracy" from the revenue chain.

The Rum Rebellion was resolved eventually through the simple expedience of the army and navy reassigning most of the officer class present in the colony to other parts of the far-flung empire. A year after he was deposed Bligh was reinstalled as governor for one day (part of the settlement terms) and then removed "officially" from the post to face court martial for his remissfulness. He was to face court martial again on two more occasions (closely followed by two promotions) before his death nine years later, in which interval he also found time to design the North Wall (Bull Wall) harbour extensions in Dublin during one of his final "commands" as director of the local Port and Docks Board.

Without the Bull Wall Dublin's port would have long ago disappeared under silt and swamp, so perhaps this unassuming and tranquil little engineering work, still enjoyed by perambulatory Dubliners to this day and which served a practical historical purpose with beneficial impact far in excess of its immediately obvious function, is the most fitting tribute to the extraordinary life and career of probably one of the most misunderstood men in British history.

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FrederickLouis
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 30 Jan 2017, 01:31

On January 29, 1813 Jane Austin published Pride and Prejudice.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Tue 14 Feb 2017, 12:27

Thomson sub-machineguns, serial numbers 2347 and 7580, used to kill 7 members and associates of Bugs Moran's North-Side Gang during the feud with Al Capone's South Side Mob in what became known as The St Valentine's Day Massacre, on 14th February 1929.



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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Tue 14 Feb 2017, 20:40

Nordmann, I didn't know that Captain Bligh had been involved in so many other mutinies or rebellions. As the old adage goes "Truth is stranger than fiction" or again there is the more mundane saying "You couldn't make it up".  I'll have to look him up on "Wiki".
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Tue 28 Feb 2017, 12:56

75 years ago (the night of 28Feb/1March 1942); the Australian cruiser Perth and the American cruiser Houston are sunk in action at the Sunda Strait by a Japanese task force:

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Tue 28 Feb 2017, 21:27

Triceratops wrote:
75 years ago (the night of 28Feb/1March 1942); the Australian cruiser Perth and the American cruiser Houston are sunk in action at the Sunda Strait by a Japanese task force:



Thank you very much Triceratops for these 6 minutes.

I prefer such documents above the nowadays so-called historical documentaries...with "experts" explaining each ten minutes and then again playing of a kind of "fictional" history in between trying to reconstruct in a kind of "theatre" the facts and evolutions of centuries ago (one advantage they mostly don't content the "sex scenes" as it seems to be usual today in the historical films).
Normally as I have it fixed on my distribution TV network, I skip the "historical" episodes and view only the experts narrative, but that is that short that one and an half hour is reduced to a mere 25 minutes and even the experts comments aren't to the point...
On the contrary how marvelled I am when I see once a real documentary as this one about the nowadays appaling situation of Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
It is in French and I am aware only Meles meles can look at it, and it is still available on Arte I suppose also in Denmark in Germand for Nielsen...





Kind reqards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Tue 28 Feb 2017, 21:31

Triceratops wrote:
25th January is Burns' Night; Tam o' Shanter as expressed in the paintings of Alexander Goudie:


Triceratops, and I forgot to thank for this beauty to...

Your friend, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 06 Mar 2017, 22:28

6th of March 1917

A hundred years ago today in a city in northern Europe the first murmurings were heard of an unfolding tumult which would reverberate down the ensuing decades of the 20th Century ...


... Frankie Howerd was born!

"Titter ye not"
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Tue 07 Mar 2017, 19:19

Vizzer,

being a continental, not so used to the British comedy, although seen in my lifetime a lot of British films, among ohters a lot of the Carry on films where Howerd seems also to star, and in fact don't really recognize him (thought first it was one od the two Ronnies...
But yes seemingly another real monument of the British film art and television...


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankie_Howerd


Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Fri 31 Mar 2017, 13:27

The most famous landmark in Paris opens this day in 1889 as part of the Exposition Universelle:


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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 05 Apr 2017, 15:33

5 April 1958, 1270 metric tons of Nitramex 2H are used to destroy the twin peaks of an underwater mountain known as Ripple Rock, British Columbia, which had claimed around 110 victims over the previous century.

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Nielsen
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 12 Apr 2017, 16:19

Somewhat belated, but on 2nd April 1801 the nefarious British instigated a battle which, at the end removed Denmark-Norway from being among the major players in Northern Europe of those days.

More may be read here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Copenhagen_(1801)
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 12 Apr 2017, 22:18

I read your link with great interest Nielsen. Here one sees how focused one is as I on the Low Countries, France Britain and later Germany. It is only recently that I looked to the sideshows as Italy, Spain, Portugal and indeed even less the Baltic states.
Yes it all was part of the epic struggle between Napoleon and Britain. And there were even two battles of Copenhagen...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Copenhagen_(1801)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Copenhagen_(1807)


And if you have other Danish history influencing the European history, "je suis partie prenante" as one says in French.

Kind regards from your friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 26 Apr 2017, 12:22

26 April 1803
Meteor fall at L'Aigle in France. The subsequent investigation convinces scientists that meteors have an extra-terrestrial origin.

L'Aigle Meteor
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 26 Apr 2017, 12:32

Triceratops wrote:
26 April 1803
Meteor fall at L'Aigle in France. The subsequent investigation convinces scientists that meteors have an extra-terrestrial origin.

L'Aigle Meteor

Trike,
 
"... The subsequent investigation convinces scientists that meteors have an extra-terrestrial origin."
 
Now who would have thought that, one lives an learns ...
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 26 Apr 2017, 12:48

Perfectly true, Nielsen. The idea that rocks could fall out of the sky was considered absurd until the end of the 18th century:

Jean Baptiste Biot's work on Meteorites: (from wiki)

Prior to Biot's thorough investigation of the meteorites that fell near l'Aigle, France in 1803, very few truly believed that rocks found on Earth could have extraterrestrial origins. There were anecdotal tales of unusual rocks found on the ground after fireballs had been seen in the sky, but such stories were often dismissed as fantasy. Serious debate concerning the unusual rocks began in 1794 when German physicist Chladni published a book claiming that rocks had an extraterrestrial origin (Westrum). Only after Biot was able to analyze the rocks at l'Aigle was it commonly accepted that the fireballs seen in the sky were meteors falling through the atmosphere. Since Biot's time, analysis of meteorites has resulted in accurate measurements of the chemical composition of the solar system. The composition and position of meteors in the solar system have also given astronomers clues as to how the solar system formed.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 26 Apr 2017, 23:24

25th April, 1916:  first Anzac Day service commemorating for NZers and Australians the disastrous Gallipoli campaign and soldiers in all wars. It is a half holiday here with the shops shut till 1pm, no mail etc, dawn parades. Anzac services in New Zealand tend to be sombre and serious, in Australia more celebratory and patriotic, at least on the march part. Since every year this is the subject of radio and television interviews, Maori TV devotes its whole programme to it for the day, and dawn and other services draw ever-growing crowds, it is hard to find something new to say about it.

But this morning they talked about Messines, which took place 100 years ago in June, and the role of the Irish in this battle and how events in Ireland at the time affected the soldiers. They had a woman called Catriona Pennell (pronounced Katrina; until recently when we had a Scottish Catriona researching native bats in this area, I always thought it was pronounced as spelt but she calls herself Katrina too) talking about this, saying the soldiers fighting alongside each other sometimes resented the fighting between RCs and Protestants back home when they were fighting the Germans and others desperately. She also said the narrative that boys were joining the war enthusiastically for an adventure was only part of the truth and quoted someone saying there were as many reasons to go to war as there were soldiers - some went for adventure, some because they were conscripted, some for duty, some for fear of being thought cowards if they didn't, some to escape an unhappy marriage or a job they disliked, some from pressure from family or friends, some in response to posters, etc.

I was reading a light NZ family saga, the Pencarrow series, written in 1933 and in the second book she gets to the first world war, and gives some of the reasons men went to war, and her protagonists also had a variety of reasons for going or not going - farmers were often needed on their farms, at the start married men were not expected to go, especially if they had families. 

I watched and/or listened to the service from Pukeahu National War Museum in Wellington this morning and the number of ambassadors/high commissioners etc from countries all over the globe amazed me – countries like Chile, Argentina, Germany, and Cuba  as well as the obvious ones like Belgium (given pride of place with it being the centenary of Passchendaele), Turkey, Australia, Britain, France, Korea and Vietnam.  In the background the National Youth Choir sang beautifully and constantly, only silencing for the final wreath laid on behalf of the veteran soldiers. (Or something like that.) The commentary was done by one of our old announcers – I knew the voice and think I can place it, but the usual radio and television form of saying who the interviewers/announcers are was obviously not deemed appropriate to the occasion. 

There was some question of security on the Turkish site for Gallipoli tomorrow, but it was highly protected and I haven't heard of any incidents. (More in my local province where a policeman shot dead his estranged wife and injured her new partner, before handing himself in.  An unprecedented event in NZ, I think.)
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Fri 28 Apr 2017, 14:31

28 April 1923, four days after completion, the Empire Stadium at Wembley hosts the FA Cup Final between Bolton Wanderers and West Ham United.
Police Horse "Billy" clears the pitch of spectators as the unexpectedly huge numbers who turn up swamp the pitch.

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Fri 28 Apr 2017, 21:47

Caro wrote:
25th April, 1916:  first Anzac Day service commemorating for NZers and Australians the disastrous Gallipoli campaign and soldiers in all wars. It is a half holiday here with the shops shut till 1pm, no mail etc, dawn parades. Anzac services in New Zealand tend to be sombre and serious, in Australia more celebratory and patriotic, at least on the march part. Since every year this is the subject of radio and television interviews, Maori TV devotes its whole programme to it for the day, and dawn and other services draw ever-growing crowds, it is hard to find something new to say about it.

But this morning they talked about Messines, which took place 100 years ago in June, and the role of the Irish in this battle and how events in Ireland at the time affected the soldiers. They had a woman called Catriona Pennell (pronounced Katrina; until recently when we had a Scottish Catriona researching native bats in this area, I always thought it was pronounced as spelt but she calls herself Katrina too) talking about this, saying the soldiers fighting alongside each other sometimes resented the fighting between RCs and Protestants back home when they were fighting the Germans and others desperately. She also said the narrative that boys were joining the war enthusiastically for an adventure was only part of the truth and quoted someone saying there were as many reasons to go to war as there were soldiers - some went for adventure, some because they were conscripted, some for duty, some for fear of being thought cowards if they didn't, some to escape an unhappy marriage or a job they disliked, some from pressure from family or friends, some in response to posters, etc.

I was reading a light NZ family saga, the Pencarrow series, written in 1933 and in the second book she gets to the first world war, and gives some of the reasons men went to war, and her protagonists also had a variety of reasons for going or not going - farmers were often needed on their farms, at the start married men were not expected to go, especially if they had families. 

I watched and/or listened to the service from Pukeahu National War Museum in Wellington this morning and the number of ambassadors/high commissioners etc from countries all over the globe amazed me – countries like Chile, Argentina, Germany, and Cuba  as well as the obvious ones like Belgium (given pride of place with it being the centenary of Passchendaele), Turkey, Australia, Britain, France, Korea and Vietnam.  In the background the National Youth Choir sang beautifully and constantly, only silencing for the final wreath laid on behalf of the veteran soldiers. (Or something like that.) The commentary was done by one of our old announcers – I knew the voice and think I can place it, but the usual radio and television form of saying who the interviewers/announcers are was obviously not deemed appropriate to the occasion. 

There was some question of security on the Turkish site for Gallipoli tomorrow, but it was highly protected and I haven't heard of any incidents. (More in my local province where a policeman shot dead his estranged wife and injured her new partner, before handing himself in.  An unprecedented event in NZ, I think.)

Caro,

"But this morning they talked about Messines, which took place 100 years ago in June, and the role of the Irish in this battle and how events in Ireland at the time affected the soldiers. They had a woman called Catriona Pennell (pronounced Katrina; until recently when we had a Scottish Catriona researching native bats in this area, I always thought it was pronounced as spelt but she calls herself Katrina too) talking about this, saying the soldiers fighting alongside each other sometimes resented the fighting between RCs and Protestants back home when they were fighting the Germans and others desperately. She also said the narrative that boys were joining the war enthusiastically for an adventure was only part of the truth and quoted someone saying there were as many reasons to go to war as there were soldiers - some went for adventure, some because they were conscripted, some for duty, some for fear of being thought cowards if they didn't, some to escape an unhappy marriage or a job they disliked, some from pressure from family or friends, some in response to posters, etc."
But this morning they talked about Messines, which took place 100 years ago in June, and the role of the Irish in this battle and how events in Ireland at the time affected the soldiers. They had a woman called Catriona Pennell (pronounced Katrina; until recently when we had a Scottish Catriona researching native bats in this area, I always thought it was pronounced as spelt but she calls herself Katrina too) talking about this, saying the soldiers fighting alongside each other sometimes resented the fighting between RCs and Protestants back home when they were fighting the Germans and others desperately. "

There was also a ceremony overhere at Messines:
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/91915764/New-Zealanders-gather-at-Messines-in-Belgium-to-mark-Anzac-Day
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Messines_(1917)

"She also said the narrative that boys were joining the war enthusiastically for an adventure was only part of the truth and quoted someone saying there were as many reasons to go to war as there were soldiers - some went for adventure, some because they were conscripted, some for duty, some for fear of being thought cowards if they didn't, some to escape an unhappy marriage or a job they disliked, some from pressure from family or friends, some in response to posters, etc."

I think you can expand this perhaps to every soldier in every army?
Perhaps as I read in my novels the same about WWI and WWII there was in the beginning no conscription? In Belgium at least it was another story. In Belgium as I have it still from the talking of my parents there was conscription before WWII. For 1914 it was perhaps another picture: In 1914 there was consription but up to 1909 there was the system of lottery and one could even, when he was consripted by lottery, even buy with money a substitute. There was even a romantic novel about it from the 19th century: "De loteling" (I don't even find the word in my Dutch-English dictionary...the allotted one?) from Hendrik Conscience...
The Belgian army 1914
http://nl.milpedia.org/wiki/Belgische_Leger_1914


Perhaps were the attitudes of these compulsory soldiers otherwise than those of the volunteers?

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Fri 28 Apr 2017, 22:49

Attitudes also changed with time. In Britain on outbreak of war in 1914 there was a rush to join up. It is well recorded that groups of friends would often join together and there were numerous instances of lads under the minimum age (18 years) lying about their age to get in, sometimes with the connivance of older friends, brothers, fathers and even the recruiting sergeants themselves. But two years later, the war had got bogged down into trench warfare, it was reaping a terrible toll in lives, and it was clear that it wasn't going to end anytime soon. Faced with this stark reality, the nation's mood had changed and the flow of volunteers had reduced to a trickle. Consequently conscription was introduced to get men into the army as soon as they attained the minimum age as very few of them were joining voluntarily. The 1916 Military Service Act was followed up by other measures designed to comb out from civillian life as many men as possible who had been exempted from the initial draft, so the maximum age for service was increased (initially from 40 to 42 but later to 51), married men were called up, those invalided out were encouraged to re-enlist, and men who had been initially rejected as unfit or who had been able to claim exemption on financial grounds (such as having numerous dependents) were re-examined and wherever possible conscripted. All these measures were thought necessary because the nation's mood had changed and men, rather than flocking to volunteer, were now often doing their utmost to try and avoid conscription.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Sat 29 Apr 2017, 20:54

Thank you very much for this update about WWI Meles meles. Another question: Was there when Britain entered the war in September 1939 already a compulsory conscription as you mentioned on WWI 1916?

Kind regards from your friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Sat 29 Apr 2017, 21:06

Caro and Meles meles,

as for the volunteers, the conscription and the participation of the Irish in WWI, quite a complex history:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland_and_World_War_I


Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Sat 29 Apr 2017, 22:54

PaulRyckier wrote:
Was there when Britain entered the war in September 1939 already a compulsory conscription as you mentioned on WWI 1916?

Conscription formally ended in 1920. But in response to the deteriorating international situation after the Munich Crisis a limited form of conscription was reintroduced in April 1939 with the intention of creating a reserve by giving several months of basic training to 21 and 22 year-olds but then discharging them from active service. But the plan was soon overtaken by events. Legislation for conscription of all men aged 18 to 41 years old was only enacted on the day war was declared (3 Sept 1939). As I understand it, unlike in WW1 there was no great rush to join up and generally everyone just waited until their call-up papers came through, and call up was strictly controlled in terms of age group, experience, geographic location and so on, specifically to avoid some of the problems of the first war which had seen many key industries depleted of manpower. I think several months before before the war started all eligible men and boys over 16 were supposed to register in advance for military service and you could then express a preference to which service you wanted to join especially if you already had some technical skills, although of course there was no guarantee you'd actually get what you hoped for. I believe my father (whose 18th birthday was in March 1940) had registered in 1939 when he was accepted onto a government engineering training scheme based in the Tyneside ship yards (this training scheme itself being a function of the rearmament program) and at that time he had expressed a preference to go into the airforce. Since he was already on a government training scheme and working in the shipyards he eventually got his call up in June 1941 when he was several months after his 19th birthday, and did go into the RAF as a aircraftman.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Sun 30 Apr 2017, 03:43

In NZ conscription came in in 1916, but not for Maori.  Later (I think) some Maori were conscripted - the tribes (Waikato and Tainui) who had refused to fight in the war on the grounds that the crown had illegally taken their lands.  But no conscripted Maori were sent overseas. 

Some Labour politicians opposed the war to the extent they were imprisonned, and one of those was Peter Fraser, who become PM on the death of the very popular Michael Joseph Savage (his photo was on the wall of most working-class families and is still a well-known photo) in 1939.  He then brought in conscription on the grounds that this war was honourable and the first world war was just nationalistic.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Fri 12 May 2017, 13:05

12 May 1926: the airship Norge makes the first flight over the North Pole. Richard Byrd had claimed to have overflown the Pole three days earlier, but this claim is disputed.

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Fri 12 May 2017, 19:48

Interesting résumé, Triceratops. It hasn't to be always wars and conflicts to be of interest.

Thank you and kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 17 May 2017, 14:02

30 years ago today, the Stark Incident.

While on patrol in the Persian Gulf, the American guided missile frigate, USS Stark was hit by two Exocet missiles fired by an Iraqi Mirage F1.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Fri 19 May 2017, 14:49

19 May 1780, the mysterious "dark day" in New England:

19 May 1780

probably caused by forest fires in Canada.

Unless!!!!!????:
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 25 May 2017, 11:14

50 years ago today, also a Thursday, early kick off in Lisbon:

Radio Times 25 May 1967
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 25 May 2017, 11:19

100 years ago today, a Friday, after losses to the Zeppelin fleet, Germany launches Operation Turkenkreuz, daylight bomber raids against London. Bad weather causes the raid to divert to Folkestone.

Gotha GIV in flight;



Route of the bomber raids of 25th May and 5th June 1917;


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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 25 May 2017, 11:25

This was on last night on BBC Scotland.  Glasgow 1967 - The Lisbon Lions

I remember it well. In that team there was only one player not from the Glasgow district - and he came from the Ayrshire coast. Them were the days.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 25 May 2017, 11:29

I watched it Ferval. Hard to believe one of the players, Steve Chalmers, nearly died of TB Meningitis, when he was a youngster.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 01 Jun 2017, 03:27

Our radio is playing the Beatles Sergeant Pepper album this week.  Today they said it was 50 years ago today that it was released but today is June 1 here, and I gather it was released on June 2 in the USA and a week or so earlier in Britain.  Never mind.  It seems incredible it could be 50 years sionce we were all agog waiting to see what they would bring in next.  Today's radio is asking us to send in our opinion on what was the best Beatles album.  I don't think I should put Beatles for Sale, which is the one I knew best and played most.

Today they played Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds and the woman who comes in daily to do exercises with me and weekly to do an hour's cleaning (and fortuitously is my next-door neighbour) was here. She is around 38 years old.  She wondered what the song was and when I told her she didn't seem to know it at all.  She's not the brightest star in the universe, but I suppose that shows more that things I assume are immutable knowledge aren't at all.  I could ask my kids but they would just be annoyed that I could think they wouldn't know.  Or make me feel old when they don't.

Now a man who looks more like a child to me has come to look at the washing machine which wouldn't go the other day, and that is making me feel ancient again!  Should be putting all this on the rant thread.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 01 Jun 2017, 10:49

This explains it, Caro. The album was supposed to be released on 1st June but EMI brought out a rush release on 26th May.

Sgt Pepper 50th

The BBC have been saying 1st June.

BBC Arts
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Thu 01 Jun 2017, 10:57

The 1843 circus poster that Lennon bought in a Rochdale antiques shop in January 1967:

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 05 Jun 2017, 13:11

There was a documentary about Sergeant Pepper on BBC2 over the weekend.

It was very good.

Slight difference in that it said the circus poster was from a shop in Sevenoaks.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 05 Jun 2017, 13:12

50 years ago today:

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 05 Jun 2017, 22:07

Triceratops wrote:
50 years ago today:



I know Triceratops, it is not on this day in history but the Yom Kippur war of 1973 was quite another story, although thanks to American supplies...
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-24402464
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yom_Kippur_War



Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Sun 11 Jun 2017, 23:37

10th June, 1886:  Mt Tarawera erupted, burying the Pink and White Terraces and killing a boatload of Maori and three Maori villages.  An estimated 153 lost their lives.  This week some researcher has claimed the terraces are not where it was assumed but somewhere else. Herald article

This is always the thing I wish could be brought back - it has always sounded wonderful to me.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 12 Jun 2017, 09:34

I'd never heard of the Pink and White Terraces ... had to look them up. Yes they do sound rather wonderful like the Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone or those at Pamukkale in Turkey, but bigger. Presumably wherever they are, they are still intact and undamaged being just buried by mud or submerged under the lake.

I wonder though if after the eruption they are still active ie still flowing with mineral-rich water. Otherwise I would imagine that even if they could be located and excavated, they might be rather a disappointment with the colours faded and the sparkling crystalline lustre gone.

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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Sat 17 Jun 2017, 08:03

On this day in history in 1397 the Union of Kalmar was enacted to enable the kingdoms of Sweden, Norway and Denmark to act as one realm.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalmar_Union
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 10 Jul 2017, 04:35

10th July 1967:  NZ changed to decimal currency.  No one of a certain age (ie around my age or older) will forget the jingle that went with it.  It is: 
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/201761838/decimal-currency
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Mon 10 Jul 2017, 06:13

10th July 1086 King Knud IV [Canute] was killed with some of his followers at the altar of the church of St. Alban in Odense in Denmark as a result of his attempting to keep the army and navy in being for more time than generally agreed on. Besides he attempted to raise taxes from free men in peacetime. Revolting peasants followed him from the North of Jutland down through the peninsula and caught up with him in Odense. He was succeded by his brother Olaf I who, along with his successor managed to get Canute canonized in 1101with this date as his saint's day.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canute_IV_of_Denmark

His only son, Charles, was taken to the comital court of Flanders where the count - his maternal grandfather - and later his uncle had him brought up according to the standards of the day. 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_I,_Count_of_Flanders


Last edited by Nielsen on Thu 13 Jul 2017, 10:36; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 12 Jul 2017, 17:26

Nielsen wrote:
10th July 1086 King Knud IV [Canute] was killed with some of his followers at the altar of the church of St. Alban in Odense in Denmark as a result of his attempting to keep the army and navy in being for more time than generally agreed on. Besides he attempted to raise taxes from free men in peacetime. Revolting peasants followed him frm the North of Jutland down through the peninsula and caught up with him in Odense. He was succeded by his brother Olaf I who, along with his successor managed to get Canute canonized in 1101with this date as his saint's day.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canute_IV_of_Denmark

His only son, Charles, was taken to the comital court of Flanders where the count - his maternal grandfather - and later his uncle had him brought up according to the standards of the day. 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_I,_Count_of_Flanders

After all those years of knowing about Karel De Goede, now to learn this, Nielsen.

And here in Bruges a bit the Canterbury thing...and the fore history of Charles...
When I am a bit better I will comment in full...

Kind regards from you friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Sat 15 Jul 2017, 22:37

Nielsen, excuses...too late tonight for elaborating my story in full...but it comes...it comes... Wink    Yes "our" Charles the Good one...

Kind regards from your friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 19 Jul 2017, 12:05

Yes Nielsen I wasn't up to now aware of the link of "our" Karel de Goede (Charles the Good)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_I,_Count_of_Flanders
and the Danish Canute IV
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canute_IV_of_Denmark
And now I see that they were both murdered, Canute in Odense and Charles the Good in Bruges in the cathedral a bit the Canterbury way...on 2 March 1127
Charles the Good was count of the county of Flanders (the true Flemings Wink ). County of Flanders not to confuse with the nowadays Flemish region of Belgium (North of Belgium) which is also called Flanders but which is composed of parts of the former county of Flanders, parts of the former Duchy of Brabant and parts of the former Prince Bishopfry of Liège
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_of_Flanders
You see somewhere I near Bruges and you from Denmark are linked somewhere in our anchestral history Wink ...

Kind regards from your friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 19 Jul 2017, 12:32

Paul,

Re yours, "... You see somewhere I near Bruges and you from Denmark are linked somewhere in our anchestral history  ..."

Also even if some almost 400 years later, the sister of HRE Emperor Charles V and ruler of the Spanish Netherlands was married to the Danish-Norwegian and sometime Swedish King Christian II before he was deposed and later imprisoned yet not murdered.
His wife, Isabella(1501-26) brought their children to court of her aunt,  the regent of the Netherlands, Margaret of Austria.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 19 Jul 2017, 21:44

Nielsen wrote:
Paul,

Re yours, "... You see somewhere I near Bruges and you from Denmark are linked somewhere in our anchestral history  ..."

Also even if some almost 400 years later, the sister of HRE Emperor Charles V and ruler of the Spanish Netherlands was married to the Danish-Norwegian and sometime Swedish King Christian II before he was deposed and later imprisoned yet not murdered.
His wife, Isabella(1501-26) brought their children to court of her aunt,  the regent of the Netherlands, Margaret of Austria.

Nielsen,

you didn't know where you brought me in... Wink  and thanks for this new link...
First: "the sister of HRE Emperor Charles V and ruler of the Spanish Netherlands"
It is complicated, but to be correct I don't think Charles V, who was also king of Spain as Carlos I, ruled only "the Netherlands" (not yet The Netherlands of today but the Low Countries (het nowadays Netherlands and Belgium (the Benelux)) the inheritance of Charles the Bold of Burgundy via his grandmother Maria of Burgundy and his father Philip the Handsome (Filips de Schone)...As such I think that he was among others duke of Burgundy, he was also HRE emperor because he bribed, thanks to the Fuggers, the electors more than François I of France

At the end of his life he split his inheritance between his son Philip II and his brother Ferdinand. I participated already in a thread about why that division. I just found an interesting discussion about the subject:
https://history.stackexchange.com/questions/11445/why-did-charles-v-divide-his-holdings-as-he-did
And yes under Philip II it became then the Spanish Netherlands but still the Low Countries. It was only after the Dutch Revolt that the Netherlands were divided with the treaty of Westphalia in 1648 into the Dutch Republic (the Seven Provinces) and the Southern Netherlands, still the Spanish Netherlands, under Albert and Isabella.

I stop here for fear to lose my elaborated message and will go further with addendums...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: On this day in history   Wed 19 Jul 2017, 22:27

Addendum to the previous message.

Nielsen, while I did research about Isabella I came again on one of my favourite women...what a woman...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_York
Sister of Edward IV and Richard III (Minette where are you?)
she was fully intertwined with the so-called War of the Roses. My last book from the local library that I read during the kidney dialysis was about this War of the Roses and I commented it overhere... 
Step grand grand mother of Charles V and third wife of Charles the Bold, duke of Burgundy.
From the wiki:
Although the marriage produced no children, Margaret proved a valuable asset to Burgundy. Immediately after her wedding, she journeyed with her stepdaughter Mary through Flanders, Brabant and Hainaut, visiting the great towns: Ursel, Ghent, Dendermonde, Asse, Brussels, Oudenaarde and Kortrijk were all impressed by her intelligence and capability.
Also from the wiki:
It was in the wake of her husband's death that Margaret proved truly invaluable to Burgundy. She had always been regarded as a skilful and intelligent politician; now, she went beyond even that. To her stepdaughter, Mary, now Duchess of Burgundy, she gave immeasurable guidance and help: using her own experiences in the court of Edward IV, where she had largely avoided being used as a pawn and contributed to the arrangement of her own marriage, she wisely guided the Duchess in deciding her marriage; against the wave of marriage offers that flooded to the two Duchesses in Ghent (from the recently widowed Duke of Clarence, from the 7-year old Dauphin of France, Charles, from a brother of Edward IV's wife, Elizabeth Woodville), she stood firm, and advised Mary to marry Maximilian of Habsburg, the 18-year-old son of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III, to whom Charles the Bold had betrothed Mary, and who was ambitious and active enough, in Margaret's opinion, to defend Mary's legacy.

Now to our subject:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_of_Austria
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_II_of_Denmark

"His wife, Isabella(1501-26) brought their children to court of her aunt,  the regent of the Netherlands, Margaret of Austria"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Austria,_Duchess_of_Savoy


Next to the following addendum...

Kind regards, Paul.
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