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 Regional accents

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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 31 May 2012, 10:10

That's not so bad Gran, I rather like Phil Harding's accent.

Just as long as you didn't look like him also, with that horrible hair and side whiskers to match affraid. lol

I know, I know, I've got me coat already..

Seriously, I don't like my accent either and they are so bloody difficult to get rid of.
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Vizzer
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sat 31 Jan 2015, 21:45

@Islanddawn wrote:
Written English does differ too though, the spelling variations in American vs British English for example.

I was recently scrolling thru the regimental muster lists and pay rolls of the Delaware militia from the 1770s (as one does) and discovered the first month of the year 1777 spelt as Janry in the state archives. I was quite excited by this because that's the way I like to spell the word. My excitement, however, turned to disappointment when the second month of the year was spelled conventionally as February. (I prefer Febry.) Further disappointment ensued when Janry itself was spelled as January for other years in the 1770s archives. It seems that the 1777 entry was merely a typesetter's abbreviation (or aberration).

That said - the spelling of the first 2 months of the year does seem to be at odds with virtually every accent (regional or social) of the English language. Attempts to give the Johnsonian/Websterian spelling of 'January' and 'February' full value in the spoken language nearly always end up sounding either forced or false. Quite often it's just hilarious. Are there other spelling variants available for those 2 months (from perhaps before the 18th century) but which more closely reflect how people actually speak?
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sat 31 Jan 2015, 21:58

Ianuarius et Februarius
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sun 01 Feb 2015, 08:00

You must all think I sound awfully posh because I pronounce them as Jan-u-arry, and Febr-u-arry, abeit with plenty of "liason" (linking/running the syllables together) and with just the lightest touch on the "u" of February. You lot just don't speak proper!


Last edited by Meles meles on Sun 01 Feb 2015, 09:57; edited 1 time in total
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sun 01 Feb 2015, 09:26

I'd say that round here the "u" is pronounced, it is the following "a" that gets elided.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sun 01 Feb 2015, 09:58

That's the word I was desparately trying to recall, "elided". Liason is French and doesn't mean quite the same thing.

And now of course I can't get this out of my head (and so beautifully pronounced too):

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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sun 01 Feb 2015, 20:51

@Caro wrote:
For reasons I don't understand, people seem to pick up accents from their place rather than their families.  People who immigrate keep their accent to a fair degree (in NZ no one doubted my grandmother was Scottish but in Scotland they thought she spoke like a NZer) but their children have the accent of the rest of the population.  People like my husband who lived his first five years in Kent and then a further one when he was 11 still speak with the accent of the place they arrive at.  It's not usually a conscious decision to fit in, though may be in older kids.

There's a South African family where I live and their third child was born in NZ, but speaks with a SA accent and I can't ever remember hearing that before.  He goes to a regular school and the family mix in the community, so I don't know why he's held their accent when it is not usual to.  

(It's a little odd to think that my grandson is going to speak with an English (Sheffield) accent - with a little bit of Welsh and NZ, I suppose.)
From 22 Feb.2012.

Caro,

"For reasons I don't understand, people seem to pick up accents from their place rather than their families."

I think because they have more exposure to the society after some years than to their family? A human is a social being and as such he picks up the language of the environment he is most embedded in?

"People who immigrate keep their accent to a fair degree (in NZ no one doubted my grandmother was Scottish but in Scotland they thought she spoke like a NZer) but their children have the accent of the rest of the population.  People like my husband who lived his first five years in Kent and then a further one when he was 11 still speak with the accent of the place they arrive at.  It's not usually a conscious decision to fit in, though may be in older kids."

I think it's a complex situation. To take the example of my family. Up to my fourteen I spoke the local dialect from a small city near Ghent, but was already exposed to the dialect of my father from near Bruges, my mother speaking the local dialect from our city. Later in the weekends I got exposed to the dialect of Ostend. At fifteen I got defenitely to live in Ostend and was going to school there too. I started first with standard Dutch, but as that was not social accepted, learned in nearly one year to speak the Ostend dialect. When I moved to near Torhout for profession and living I learned the local dialect and after one year spoke it too. But even after 55 years I can go neatless to my original dialect from near Ghent.
But my mother spoke even after a 60 years exposure to the Ostend dialect still her dialect from near Ghent.
My aunt from Bruges (city! dialect) spokes in Ostend also always till she died her local Bruges dialect. And her two sons had, although they went to school in Ostend, still the characteristics of the Brugean dialect.
And it are not only the sounds of the vowels which differ but also a lot of complete other words...

"There's a South African family where I live and their third child was born in NZ, but speaks with a SA accent and I can't ever remember hearing that before.  He goes to a regular school and the family mix in the community, so I don't know why he's held their accent when it is not usual to"

Caro, it is only a guess, but some youngsters seem to like, perhaps because they are then perceived as "special" to maintain their original dialect, to have a special position in the group?

Kind regards and with esteem, Paul.
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sun 01 Feb 2015, 22:36

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqIcbLkY2iY

A lot of offcomers think "Black Country" is the same as Birmingham.
It ay. They spake funny in Brummagem.
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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 02 Feb 2015, 15:01

There was a story that when Maggie Smith was preparing for her role in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, she was advised to contact a lady who lived in Morningside, Edinburgh, and who had just the accent that Maggie was looking for.

So, Maggie Smith duly phoned up the lady in question and said " I would like to record your accent for my use in an upcoming film . Would it be all right if I treat you to lunch and bring along a tape recorder?"

To which there was a rather indignant reply "Young woman, I have absolutely no accent whatsoever!!!!"* and slammed the phone down.

*In best Morningside.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 02 Feb 2015, 15:36

The British Sound Library has a number of recordings of British & Commonwealth POWs made by the Germans in WW1. Organised by county:

http://sounds.bl.uk/Accents-and-dialects/Berliner-Lautarchiv-British-and-Commonwealth-recordings
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 02 Feb 2015, 16:48

@Meles meles wrote:
That's the word I was desparately trying to recall, "elided". Liason is French and doesn't mean quite the same thing.

And now of course I can't get this out of my head (and so beautifully pronounced too):

Sort of on topic (Flanders & Swan were a delight in my childhood) :-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EdY1Y5XNJBY
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