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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 27 Feb 2012, 21:37

@Caro wrote:
Having searched for ages (the search function on the defunct BBC boards doesn't seem to work any more), I found it was more on the History board than the WOM this was talked about. They mentioned Neil McGregor, I think. Someone said, "So RP is essentially a social accent, but it's also conditioned by geography. The further you go from London and the South East, the fewer RP speakers you find." [The Scottish people mostly disagreed with this.]

I think to me it is not so much social as geographical. Unless a NZer has deliberately changed their accent (and I heard a Year 13 boy from a private school here once whose very posh accent put the Queen's to shame, and was cringe-making in the extreme to my ears) they can't really be considered to speak with an RP accent, just an educated NZ one. RP is an accent from England. Not Scotland, or Canada, or India or Ireland or NZ.

Caro,

with the method I mentioned and the search term: Neil Mc Gregor I found only this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbhistory/NF2233812?thread=8148983

See the message 6 from Shivfan.

Kind regards,

Paul.
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 27 Feb 2012, 22:03

@Priscilla wrote:
Not so sure about that. My daughter sounds just like me but was raised in the subcontinent - by servants for much of the time and she attended a local private Grammar school there but she has no local English accent or pronunciation whatsoever. Her eldest son has a Yorkshire accent like his dad and not Midlands where they live - and he often changes words when with me. The word lunch springs to mind though I have never remarked on the way he says it at home. I think many people slip into a speech form which is comfortable to them in the company they are with. Being a natural mimic I am very very careful about using it unless among close friends.

"I think many people slip into a speech from which is comfortable to them in the company they are with"

I suppose I do it as Gil, as I know the dialect of my counterpart, I use his dialect for the conversation and many times they don't even know it that I am not from their region. I do it with German, French, English too, but there they hear that I am a foreigner, unless it is a Dutch one, who immediately hear that I am a Flemish speaking one...a bit as with English and American...but more distinguished...

Kind regards,

Paul.

PS: The previous double posting is caused, because seemingly someone posted at the same moment and I received a message to modifie or send...and I send...with the former result.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 28 Feb 2012, 14:42

I used to work in Hertfordshire, on the edge of London, in the early 1970s, and the variety of accents was marvellous. Half the workforce were pure rural 'aaaaarrrtfordshoire', almost to the point of chewing a straw, and half were pure 'Norff Lunnon' wide boys, who were spreading out into 'bumpkinland' at great speed around that time. We also had a few "zzzoider' drinkers up from 'Zumerset', a few Scots, and a odd Brummie, and a few few Irish, including myself - the only Ulsterman.

I loved the variety of regional differences that characterize the whole country, and I hate the way TV is turning us all into Americans.
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normanhurst
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 29 Feb 2012, 07:54

One thing I have noticed over a period of time is the emphasis on the last word when running through a number of points in a speech… almost as annoying as the ‘up speak’ that’s crept into the Australian English recently and very much copied over here in some circles.


Although this end of sentence emphasis I’m referring to has been kicking around for a while, I’d never noticed it prior to Margret Thatcher’s close up interviews to camera and in that (to me) patronising manner as if trying to make out she actually cared.
Watch almost any interview on the box now and its becoming increasingly prominent…


Did this style of address exist before, is it a regional accent, was it just her style, was it typical to the area/environment she was working from, did others adopt this style to emulate her, does anyone understand my question or is it just all in my mind.
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 05:31

The other day my husband was doing a telephone survey thing about his hospital treatment which used voice recognition. He had to rank things on a scale of 1 - 10. When he said '10' to one answer the voice said, "Sorry, I do not recognise this answer," and repeated that when he said it again. Later he again answered 10 but this time when it wasn't recognised changed it to 9. This was for a NZ organisation (a not-for-profit health insurance company) so you would expect it to be able to understand a NZ 10. He didn't know how to change it so it would recognise it - would 'tan' have been better perhaps. I remember when a Sheffield shop assistant couldn't understand my 'pen' that my brother-in-law told me I should have said 'payn'.

And I am not quite sure exactly what you were asking about in the above post, Norman - is this emphasis in a list of things, in which case I think that might be quite a normal way of ensuring you finish with a flourish.

Caro.
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normanhurst
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 06:23

Hi caro… last year during the world cup rugby, a friend in NZ for a ‘joke’ sent me a mini NZ – English dictionary of rugby phrases. Now why is it that as soon as you throw something away… almost immediately you regret it. It could only be a few weeks ago I deleted it form my PC, and yay, even reading the phases it just ‘spoke’ out NZ… quite amazing really.

Yes caro your quite right, the emphasis I refer to is at the end of each item on a list… its read out in a normal manner, but the voice tone and style changes on the last word of every line. You say it might be a normal way of ensuring you finish with a flourish… thing is, and I can’t understand why, I’d never noticed it before. It appears to have crept into our speech mannerism in the same way that the Australian ‘upspeach’ has. I’ve asked Aussie friends about that, and most say it annoys the hell out of them too.
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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 07:57

For three weeks I introduced a new staff member whose papers had not arrived as 'Windy' She was Wendy from NZ. People now get named Sky and Summer and Gale so why not Windy I had asked myself. I may have probed further had I heard Drought or Downpour. She never corrected me so I assume she was happy with my pronounciation. Wording a late apology was not easy either. The UK staff being a perservse lot she stayed as Windy, of course.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 13:20

Not surprising P, NZers do get their vowels arse about face!

I've noticed that some English pronounce the ing ending on words differently, it sounds more like in...g (hard g) or sometimes like ink. Is this entirely a regional pronunciation or accent also?
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 13:39

Strine can lead to confusion too. The famous story about Rupert Murdoch's party for executives when he bought the Times Newspaper Group springs to mind. The company organising the bash got a message from the new boss saying that this was to be a "no expense spared" affair and as British as it could possibly be to allay fears that such a great institution might be on the slippery slope to the National Enquirer style tabloidism beloved of the new administration (perish the thought!).

Guests on their arrival were to be regaled by the Coldstream Guards Band outside the Grosvenor Hotel and then, the new director ordered, when all 150 were ushered into the dining hall they were to have a piper each. The organisers, upon being told that the Guards hadn't more than 30 pipers, then sought frantically throughout every available army, police, ex-pat Irish, Scottish and youth club pipe band in London to find the remaining 120 at short notice. To their immense relief, and pride, they actually managed it, and as the guests filed into the dining hall all 150 struck up a rousing rendition of "We're No Awa' Tae Bide Awa'" while the impressed - if deafened - guests took their pews.

Impressed except for the last guest - Murdoch himself - who used a version of Anglo-Saxon even a Saxon would have frowned at, and at a decibel level even higher than the hastily assembled musicians (for want of a better term for a bagpiper) could muster, which roughly translated as "What on earth are all these pipers doing here?". The Premier Maitre, hurt and confused, replied that he (Murdoch) himself had ordered them. "No!" screamed Murdoch. "I said a piper for everyone, not a f*cking piper!!!" (Imitate an Australian accent and you'll see what happened here ...)
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 14:02

Oi, fair crack at the sauce bottle mate, Strayans don't tawk loike thet.

Edit. Ouch the ghost of Sister Anthony Mary just cracked my knuckles with her big ruler for that too. We, as young ladies, were not permitted to speak like those common people.


Last edited by Islanddawn on Tue 06 Mar 2012, 05:32; edited 1 time in total
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 22:08

Did Wendy actually notice you were calling her Windy, P? Or did she just hear your Windy as Wendy as I suspect? Anyway, as you say, Windy will do fine as a name.

There were attempts at eradicating the NZ accent in the early days; thankfully that has died out, though people criticise our PM for speaking with a broadish NZ accent and slurring his words a little. New Zillud is his normal version of our country's name. Amazing how hard it is for people to change a local accent - teachers were scolded for not doing better, though I daresay they tried, and our broadcasting was all done in poncy southern British till about 40 years ago. All to no avail. Good.
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normanhurst
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 22:11

Oi... I'm from poncy southern britain...
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 22:25

Yes, so it was quite suitable for you to speak poncy southern British, but not for NZers who have their own language/dialect/accent to speak. (You're not the first person I've insulted in this way. Tim (of Aclea) also made rather plaintive complaints on the subject once.)
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 22:41

The "hard g -ing" was one of the two Walsall variants I referred to earlier. The other side (north) of the town had the more usual west midlands "-in" pronunciation. It's not that long ago that schools in Wales had a "Welsh cap" - like a dunce's cap, and a child who used Welsh would be forced to wear it, passing it on to the next miscreant etc. The person wearing it at the end of the day was thrashed.
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 22:45

Is that true or urban legend? Maori people remember being hit for speaking Maori at school, but I am not sure it was actual discrimination so much as trying to ensure everyone spoke a good Queen's English. It was also the policy of Maori leaders that Maori should not be spoken at school.
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Mon 05 Mar 2012, 23:45

True- at least, it was reported, as the "Welsh Not", in a Royal Commission report in C19th. Not sure when it wasabolished.
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normanhurst
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 04:05

I think that’s dreadful, especially if it was also the policy of the Maori leaders… but I can remember getting hit at school and I never knew why, maybe for not speaking poncy enough.


I think it’s a very small minority that speak the poncy queens English as you call it, and I’m certainly not one of them. I love to hear the regional accents, and just along the south coast where I live, the accent changes about every 20-50 miles, probably less now as I think accents are being watered down by 24 hour a day TV… but even on some of the local radio stations it’s difficult to pick out the local accents.
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 06:15

I think Caro might mean the standard BBC speak of the day Norman, or as you say, Queen's English. It was the accent once used in all media broadcasts in the Antipodes, and it was strictly enforced for anyone who wanted a job in the media.

Southern England is as varied in accent as the rest of England so "Southern British" is too vague a description imo. Or is it a Thames estuary accent you mean Caro? I've heard people complaining that, through tv, that accent is becoming more common also.

Thanks Gil on Walsall. I've noticed a few people on radio with that accent and wondered. Stan Cauliflower on Talk Sport does too, on the rare occasions I've had to endure listening to him or that station anyway.
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 07:26

I suppose I mean RP, but yes the BBC English that announcers from that time now smile about. I don't know if they had to be able to speak it when they went for a job in local broadcasting, or if they could be trained in the right way to speak.

The Maori leaders, Norman, wanted their children to succeed in a Pakeha (European) world, and thought one way to help was to forbid Maori being spoken in the playground or in school time, and ensure they learn English well. And teachers in those day used corporal punishment frequently. It had the unfortunate effect of people losing their language to a large degree and people having to learn it from scratch.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 10:07

In the past, I know many Australian broadcasters would spend time in England working and refining their accents, possibly it was the same for NZers Caro? John Kerr (if I remember his name correctly) on Sydney radio describes his time in England occasionally, and his work on the illegal radio stations in the UK during the 60s. It is an interesting period of transition.

Edit. There was a film made about the illegal stations a couple of years ago, can someone tell me the name please? Haven't seen it yet and would like to download it to have a look.
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nordmann
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 10:57

The Boat That Rocked

Sounds woeful.
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 13:05

Thanks Nordmann, the film could very well be awful but I shall give it a whorl and see anyway.
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 20:23

We saw that movie a few months ago - entertaining enough. Had some reservations but I can't recall what they were - too long? an unnecessary romance?

We were interested in the parallels with the NZ situation at the same time - they set up pirate radios here on ships too. I remember it dominated the news at the time and was all very fascinating. We seemed to go from a country with a couple of state-owned stations with local variations through the country where teenagers had to tune in to Australian stations to hear the latest pop music to one which has a station on every radio wave, interfering with each other. And generally rubbishy or shock-jocky. So, with all those choices I listen to one only. (Difficult to get the local stations, provided only twenty minutes down the road. At least in the past we could hear our own news and local advertising. Was there advertising? one programme was well-known for the woman presenter (Aunt Daisy) talking of products so I suppose there was.)
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 21:43

And my generation had Radio Luxembourg on 208, Double Your Money, Take Your Pick, Perry Mason and Pete Murray's Top 20, not at all like the Home or Light services.
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normanhurst
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 22:10

And the next 20 minutes are brought to you by ‘Horace Bachelor’… and then it fades as you try to listen to your favourite pop tune.


The pirate stations were brilliant and finally made it clear that Edmundo Ross, Victor Sylvester and the Midland Light Orchestra was not really what the youth of the day wanted.
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 06 Mar 2012, 22:34

HB! He of the sainted infra-draw method! Ah yes! We used to listen to the top 10 (bottom upwards) on Pick of the Pops before school tea was served, then the top 20 (top downwards) on Lux under the bedclothes. ISTR that started at 11PM and wenever managed to stay awake beyond the top 3 or 4.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 07 Mar 2012, 05:02

We didn't have pirated radio in Australia, commercial and community radio always operated alongside the state stations as far as I'm aware. Although, Australia was always too insular (still is, much like the US in that respect) and we did have to tune in to the BBC World Service to get any proper news from outside or to hear the cricket when Australia were playing away. But the only time you could get a decent reception on the BBC was in the middle of the night, there was too much interference during the day.

Mmm, I've managed to waylay the thread somewhat with talk of radio above. Sorry.
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 07 Mar 2012, 16:53

Were there / are there differences in Australian accents between different areas?
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Islanddawn
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 07 Mar 2012, 18:31

Not really Gil. There is a slight difference in accents that reflect social class and a urban or rural upbringing such as a cultivated, average or broard accent but nothing like the variety you have in the UK. Australia is fairly homogenous in that respect.

Oddly it is the use of words that reflect where a person is from in Australia. For example, cozzies or swimmers is used in NSW, togs in Queensland and bathers is used in Victoria and South Australia. Or a 10 fl oz glass of beer is called a middy in NSW, handle in Northern Territory, pot in Victoria and Queensland, schooner in South Australia, ten in Tasmania and a half pint in Western Australia.

There are some grammatical differences also, e.g. a Queenslander will end a sentence with an interrogative "eh"? or will place "but" at the end a of sentence.
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 07 Mar 2012, 20:09

thanks. I wondered about that largely because I reckon that until the coming of air travel the major population centres must have been largely cut off from each other, which you would think would tend to increase local idioms and accents.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 08 Mar 2012, 05:53

One would think so Gil, but for some reason the accent has remained fairly unifrom compared to other English speaking countries.

As early as 1827 the children of colonists and convicts had evolved a distinctive accent and vocabulary, largely influenced by both the Irish and South East English.

From Sydney the dialect spread throughout the country and it was strong enough to deflect influences from other speech patterns bought by successive waves of immigrants. Only absorbing certain terms or words from other regions or the various Aboriginal languages, some words have remained localised whilst others have become part of general use.

But it has only been 200yrs, very early days yet. The language is still being influenced by immigrant waves and thus continually evolving. Here are some examples of the few regional differences that exist http://clas.mq.edu.au/australian-voices/regional-accents
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normanhurst
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 08 Mar 2012, 06:51

What about the written word. No matter what regional accent you have it doesn’t transfer onto paper does it. Some authors may write with a hint of an accent, but only to emphasise that ‘Peter Trelawney’ is a Cornishman or Paddy McGuire is from the emerald isles… but the bulk of text will be in plain English.


I can’t recall when I first noticed peoples accent, but many years ago my father was exhibiting his business products on a trade stall at the earls court boat show… directly opposite was the rescued Tristan da Cunha islanders. They were building one of their local boats, and as I was helping my father to build a boat in our home workshop I was forever in there with them… such a friendly group of people, but a strange tongue… almost Shakespearian to my tender young ears.


Do you write with an accent?
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 08 Mar 2012, 17:32

Norman :

Yes, I've heard the archive tapes of the T da C people's speech, and it has an archaic tinge, just as the vocabulary of some parts of New England does - words such as "fall" were AIUI common in the English speech of the time of the early colonists. Odd places retain old words - Melvyn Bragg did a prog about language in which he cited numerous Cumbrian speech idiosyncracies, and older people from two towns (or villages, depending on your viewpoint) in this area, Gornal and Gornal Wood, still use, without overt sexism, the term "wench".
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Fri 09 Mar 2012, 05:43

@normanhurst wrote:
What about the written word. No matter what regional accent you have it doesn’t transfer onto paper does it. Some authors may write with a hint of an accent, but only to emphasise that ‘Peter Trelawney’ is a Cornishman or Paddy McGuire is from the emerald isles… but the bulk of text will be in plain English.

Written English does differ too though, the spelling variations in American vs British English for example. Anyone wishing to study the English language from non English speaking countries will usually have a choice whether they prefer to learn American or British English. Or schools offering English in their cariculum will use one or the other, here in Greece the school system uses British English. Even keyboards differ, there are American and British English varieties on the market.

Not only can spelling differences be an indication of nationality in the written word but also the particular word used can differ, fall/autumn, eggplant/aubergine, truck/lorry, sidewalk/pavement, porch/stoop, paddock/field, the bush/forrest etc.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 16 May 2012, 23:59

@PaulRyckier wrote:
@Caro wrote:
Having searched for ages (the search function on the defunct BBC boards doesn't seem to work any more), I found it was more on the History board than the WOM this was talked about. They mentioned Neil McGregor, I think. Someone said, "So RP is essentially a social accent, but it's also conditioned by geography. The further you go from London and the South East, the fewer RP speakers you find." [The Scottish people mostly disagreed with this.]

I think to me it is not so much social as geographical. Unless a NZer has deliberately changed their accent (and I heard a Year 13 boy from a private school here once whose very posh accent put the Queen's to shame, and was cringe-making in the extreme to my ears) they can't really be considered to speak with an RP accent, just an educated NZ one. RP is an accent from England. Not Scotland, or Canada, or India or Ireland or NZ.

Caro,

with the method I mentioned and the search term: Neil Mc Gregor I found only this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbhistory/NF2233812?thread=8148983

See the message 6 from Shivfan.

Kind regards,

Paul.

Here are a couple of others:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbhistory/NF2233809?thread=6589577

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbhistory/NF2233809?thread=7806354

regards

Vizzer

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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 17 May 2012, 00:49

Thanks Vizzer. It's only three years since I started that topic, and I have no memory of doing so at all. I see you and I don't quite agree with where RP is spoke, though I also see that Stoggler, whose knowledge on language I always had a lot of respect for (and where is he now?) spoke of its origins as southern England/London seat of power language. I still don't think you can speak Received Pronunciation with a Scottish or NZ accent. You can speak it in Scotland or NZ, but that's different.

Cheers, Caro. (Lovely to see you here, Vizzer, even if we don't always agree!)
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 17 May 2012, 05:08

Yes, thanks for the links Viz. I haven't been back there since they booted us out and it was good to see it again.

Even Cass's droning about himself was verging on the nostalgic. I note that Nordmann has ceased to exist though, does that mean that Oh Great Dictator is merely a cheap re-production of the original? Mmmmm
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Fri 18 May 2012, 12:08

What I find remarkable is that in Jersey, an Island only 9x5 miles, there are often believed to be regional accents. Those in the west (particularly St Ouen) have a stronger accent than in the east (where I come from). I should perhaps point out that the Jersey accent is often compared to that of South Africa. Something rather depressing I once overheard was in a departures lounge at Gatwick. Waiting to fly back to Jersey, I heard one of the staff there having to phone Jersey Airport. She obviously got someone with a local accent, because having concluded her phone-call, she asked a colleague, "Where's Jersey? Is it in South Africa?"

Having been born of parents from the UK, however (one Shrewsbury, one Greater London) I have always considered myself to have an English accent (RP-ish, in fact). However, friends at university considered me to have a slightly foreign tint to my speech; I do wonder if, having been born and bred in Jersey, I have somehow picked up a hint of the local accent.

Going further north, the 'Geordie' accent is generally associated with Newcastle and the surrounding area. However, another university friend insisted the true Geordie accent was confined to a much small, more specific area (which she came from; alas, I can't remember where that was). Even yet further north, I have two Scottish colleagues, and they have two distinct accents. One is from near the border, with a pleasantly soft accent. The other is from Glasgow, and comes with a far harsher - not to say nigh on incomprehensible - accent.

@Caro wrote:
That rising inflexion is certainly not confined to Australia - it's really quite widespread now, and I'm not even sure it originated in Australia.

A random fact for you: from 1963-67, the Daleks of Doctor Who fame spoke in a largely monotone manner, which just the occasional change of inflextion to emphasise a point or emotion. However, in 1967 Roy Skelton took over and introduced certain changes which became the standard even up to the present day. These included more changes in tone and speed, emphasising and drawing out certain words, and also ending almost every sentence with an upwards inflexion. His voicing of the Cybermen in The Tenth Planet (1966) also had a tendency to upwards inflexion. I don't know if there was any connection to the way he spoke; he was born in Oldham.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sat 19 May 2012, 13:10

I'm from Newcastle, A-N, and I couldn't really say where Geordie starts or ends.
I believe that at one time there used to be a story that you had to be born within earshot of Armstrong's factory hooter but I suspect this is as as accurate to the Cockney/Bow Bells tale.

I don't know if it's the same elsewhere (I would guess it is) but the Geordie accent seems to be disappearing and turning into some sort of drawl with a NE accent. I used to be able to tell if someone was from Byker/Walker (3 miles from where I used to live), from Ashington (5 miles away - though Geordies would say that's Pit Yakker, not Geordie), but these distinctions only seem to remain among older people.

What your friend may have been referring to is the fact that folk from "Down South" refer to Sunderland and Middlesborough accents as Geordie while we can tell straight away that they are Mackems or Smoggies. I say "we", but since I learned to speak in villages in Lincolnshire and Gloucestershire I don't have an identifiable accent. I have been mistaken for Scottish, Irish, Welsh, and on one occasion a Welshman thought I was American.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sat 19 May 2012, 16:50

The rising inflection - see I'm going all modern - is/was very common in my Essex home town especially among rural and fishing families. Few use the full accent now - or come to that understand those who use it. My garden help, only speaks it and he is treated like a retard in his main job, so his wife says. I understand him very well since my mother spent years making sure I never used it. I imagine most children can speak their local 'street' - and must, to survive. I became a skilful mimic as a result. ...... a dangerous skill.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Tue 22 May 2012, 23:56

@Caro wrote:
Thanks Vizzer. It's only three years since I started that topic, and I have no memory of doing so at all. I see you and I don't quite agree with where RP is spoke, though I also see that Stoggler, whose knowledge on language I always had a lot of respect for (and where is he now?) spoke of its origins as southern England/London seat of power language. I still don't think you can speak Received Pronunciation with a Scottish or NZ accent. You can speak it in Scotland or NZ, but that's different.

Cheers, Caro. (Lovely to see you here, Vizzer, even if we don't always agree!)
Thanks Caro.

Here's another Scottish RP accent to go with Neil MacGregor's:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-18161058

It's St Clair Bonde - (about 00.47 in).
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 23 May 2012, 14:38

I also spoke pure 'Pitmatic Geordie' at school and with friends but fairly accentless at home - I was practically bi-lingual!
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 24 May 2012, 23:15

@Islanddawn wrote:
Yes, thanks for the links Viz. I haven't been back there since they booted us out and it was good to see it again.

Even Cass's droning about himself was verging on the nostalgic. I note that Nordmann has ceased to exist though, does that mean that Oh Great Dictator is merely a cheap re-production of the original? Mmmmm



Islanddawn,

as I understend it and as I think to know Nordmann a bit (but not sure about that statement) it was a kind of "ironic" protest to the BBC to manifest that he didn't exist anymore on the BBC.

But we can ask it himself.

Kind regards and with esteem for that lady on that Greek island,

Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Sat 26 May 2012, 23:43

At this stage I have to admit I have an Adge Cutler accent as I originate from Bristol, when I was a child we used even to say thee and thou. However when we moved a whole 8 miles into South Gloucestershire I could hardly understand the locals. I have been out of England for 46 years but people can still pick that I am from Bristol. Sigh, I wish it was different.

Gran
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 30 May 2012, 00:37

This is not really a regional accent, more a racial one I guess, it seems to have gone viral here, officialy called Legend but known unoficialy as Ghost Chups.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIYvD9DI1ZA
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Wed 30 May 2012, 05:42

Nice clip Gran, but I was struggling to understand the English. Had to watch it a couple of times just to make sure I had the hid, cresh, chups et al correct.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 31 May 2012, 00:33

I thought you might enjoy wrestling with that ID, of course Caro will see it most nights, but it seems to have got to the target market and I guess that was the aim.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 31 May 2012, 01:21

Yes, good ad. I don't know whether these ads change anything - personally think reconfiguring roads makes the biggest difference to the road toll.

I was reading last night, Gran, an anthology on railway journeys and it had one story by John Betjamen, where he said, "Like many great movements in this country, the Great Western [railway] was born in Bristol." I haven't been to Bristol, but obviously he felt it a place worth celebrating. I am amazed if NZers really can pick your Bristol accent. Last week I was listening to a "Scotsman" giving a talk and after about 15 minutes I realised the reason he spoke with a bit of a lisp - d instead of t and t instead of th, I think - was that he was Irish!
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 31 May 2012, 07:00

I'm always amazed that Scottish and Irish accents are confused, they are really very different.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 31 May 2012, 08:12

When I first left England in, ahem 1966 I spoke like Phil Harding on "Time Team", it has improved over the years but it is still there unfortunately.
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PostSubject: Re: Regional accents    Thu 31 May 2012, 10:10

That's not so bad Gran, I rather like Phil Harding's accent.

Just as long as you didn't look like him also, with that horrible hair and side whiskers to match affraid. lol

I know, I know, I've got me coat already..

Seriously, I don't like my accent either and they are so bloody difficult to get rid of.
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