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 The Tumbleweed Suite

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ferval
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 30 Jul 2017, 17:35

Yes, me too. I fear I may have been a tad intemperate but these days I take it as one of the privileges of age to be, well, frank and that can spillover into rudeness. I apologise if I have crossed the line.

I do hope we see the Boss back soon, I hope he realises how much he is missed.
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 31 Jul 2017, 22:57

Sorry guys and lasses,

no time this evening, the whole evening doing research for a thread on Historum about "thiois" diets, dutch and commenting a certain Claude Javeau about a chapter about languages in Belgium. Rather biassed about the present situation
https://goo.gl/6Ecqop
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Javeau
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Sp%C3%A4ti


Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 01 Aug 2017, 13:23

I see that you are online Meles meles. I had some difficulties to log in. Since two days nobody let a message overhere. What happens? Have they no access to the board? Or do I miss something?

Kind regards, PauL.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 01 Aug 2017, 13:59

I don't think you missed anything, Paul, just that nothing has happened.
My hope is that everybody is in good health, and have been busy elsewhere.

Cheers.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 01 Aug 2017, 14:05

I see Nielsen that you are online too now. I just sent a message to you and Caro on Jiglu to enlighten us...

I checked the boards and the fore last message was from Vizzer 30 July 2017 18h45 and the last one was from Tim of Aclea 30 July 2017 18h45. Since then it seems that only I am able to post on the messageboard Res Historica...If you or Caro have no access overhere give a réplique on Jiglu...

Kind regards to both, Paul.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 01 Aug 2017, 14:06

I just assumed everyone was on holiday or otherwise occupied. It's the middle of the busy season here so at the moment I really have little time to even think about matters historical. There are a few of us still around though and I did notice that a new member, bramhall80, has appeared a few times too.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 01 Aug 2017, 19:41

Same here, no trouble with logging onto the site or anything like that, I am merely flat out at the moment. Summer silly season is upon us and it won't settle down until after August.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 01 Aug 2017, 19:50

@Islanddawn wrote:
Same here, no trouble with logging onto the site or anything like that, I am merely flat out at the moment. Summer silly season is upon us and it won't settle down until after August.


Embarassed  quote from Paul...
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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 02 Aug 2017, 18:13

So calling all  the lazy/unemployed Res Historians to man the defences and post. This used to be a site for sore ayes - and no's even - for the fool hardy. I would suggest a round of summer cocktails but will leave that to members to concoct   and name something original with an historical slant to get us reeling again.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 03 Aug 2017, 08:09

@Priscilla wrote:
So calling all  the lazy/unemployed Res Historians to man the defences and post. This used to be a site for sore ayes - and no's even - for the fool hardy.


Fool - or frost - hardy? Or even Laurel and Hardy?


I've just been listening to England Lost* which someone has suggested should be our new National Anthem. "London's going to be like Singapore"? Oh, pull yourself together, Mick! Get a grip! I wonder if Jagger gets the Winter Fuel Allowance like the rest of us? I bet he does. Love the shots of our bleak North Sea though - or is it the English Channel? Is it still the English Channel? The French call it the Sleeve, don't they, which is a very odd name for a bit of sea. I rather like the Roman name: Mare Britannicum - sounds very grand.



* Jagger's latest release. Not bad for a 74-year-old, I suppose, but I doubt the kids will be impressed - or bothered.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 06 Aug 2017, 12:07

@Priscilla wrote:
So calling all  the lazy/unemployed Res Historians to man the defences and post. This used to be a site for sore ayes - and no's even - for the fool hardy. I would suggest a round of summer cocktails but will leave that to members to concoct   and name something original with an historical slant to get us reeling again.

Some of us have been dealing with all the slings and arrows and been left with very little energy for sensible thought. I won't bore you with all the details of everything that went awry but this is just one: my ancient and much loved car expired in a cloud of steam 30 odd miles away and even the ministrations of the AA and a good garage there couldn't save it. Fortunately it was on a bus route and bless my free bus pass. Getting a replacement plus travelling up and down (several times, don't ask) kept me occupied plus both my children's cars had not dissimilar experiences at the same time so life was busy and stressful. I don't want to see a garage or speak to an insurance company for a long, long time.

All is now (mostly) resolved so life can resume. Until the next crisis.........
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 07 Aug 2017, 04:44

@Temperance wrote:
@Priscilla wrote:
So calling all  the lazy/unemployed Res Historians to man the defences and post. This used to be a site for sore ayes - and no's even - for the fool hardy.


Fool - or frost - hardy? Or even Laurel and Hardy?


I've just been listening to England Lost* which someone has suggested should be our new National Anthem. "London's going to be like Singapore"? Oh, pull yourself together, Mick! Get a grip! I wonder if Jagger gets the Winter Fuel Allowance like the rest of us? I bet he does. Love the shots of our bleak North Sea though - or is it the English Channel? Is it still the English Channel? The French call it the Sleeve, don't they, which is a very odd name for a bit of sea. I rather like the Roman name: Mare Britannicum - sounds very grand.



* Jagger's latest release. Not bad for a 74-year-old, I suppose, but I doubt the kids will be impressed - or bothered.


I liked it, and Jagger was to the point imo. England is changing and blindly heading into very dangerous waters indeed. 

It wasn't the Wrinkly Wrocker who said London will be like Singapore btw Temp, that was the leave campaign who claimed that London could become the next Singapore as a positive result of Brexit. But it is ridiculous like most things the Brexiteers have claimed and Jagger is merely playing on that.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 14 Aug 2017, 09:53

I read that it is allotment week this week. Bring in yer bendy bananas, curly cucumbers and warm reminisces of the old allotment wars in the BBC bar.  They were fun.
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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 14 Aug 2017, 10:26

What I need is cheap imported labour - or tory even - to cope with harvest yer own after this great grow yer own season. First it rained plums,now it's apples. And what to do with 50 huge beetroot all plumped up at the same time? Thus it is also with carrots and cauli, they went into overdrive. Runner beans with 2k a day pick now crowd out the freezer and marrows (neglected courgettes in truth) creating  hidden stumbling blocks across paths.... and even the hanging baskets each have a  parsley crop. How did that happen?The summer house has baskets of drying onions - which will probably mix with the drying daff bulbs, kill us all in a fry up and thus ending the problem.....at least the wake will have  raspberries for all - they ought have it by the canes because they just keep on chucking 'em out.
 I shall return to haunt the veg plot
There's Temps wondering with alarm about the complexities of the human condition, ferv busy soul-denying, nord lost in a Bermuda triangle, Paul, https'ing, MM sorting out his Ruben nude album and me being killed off by me five a day. Hope you get some better post response, ID.... but B+ for effort.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 14 Aug 2017, 10:51

I also agonise over the vegetable condition.

I often think of your runner-bean, Priscilla, and its little onion friend - how, in their determined, defiant refusal to be horticulturally tamed by you or anyone else, they were the Cathy and Heathcliff of the vegetable world.

Your star-crossed vegetables somehow cropped up in the Philosophy section of Res His - goodness knows why or how. Nordmann was all erudite and scientific about their unhealthy, symbiotic relationship if I remember correctly, and we ignored him (as usual). MM expressed - on the same thread - his concerns about his bipolar courgettes.

Happy days.


Last edited by Temperance on Mon 14 Aug 2017, 13:27; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 14 Aug 2017, 11:25

Just in case everyone thinks I've completely lost the vegetable plot, you can read about P.'s errant runner bean here:

https://reshistorica.historyboard.net/t870-logic-logical-and-illogical


EDIT 1: MM's clinically depressed courgettes aren't on the above thread about Logic: they must have been mentioned in another discussion - possibly the Plato thread.


EDIT 2:
I wrote:
 Nordmann was all erudite and scientific about their unhealthy, symbiotic relationship if I remember correctly, and we ignored him (as usual).



Poor nordmann - all he ever wanted was for us to be rational - sensible even. No wonder he has disappeared.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 07:09

Talking of vegetables, I’m having a very fruitful season too – I reckon I reached peak courgette last week, when I was literally falling over the things that seemed to have appeared, as if by magic, overnight. What do you do with your over-size courgette/marrows, P? I made mine into a Thai-style coconut and green pepper curry. But courgettes are old news … I’m now at about peak tomato:





.... plus there are peppers, aubergines, French beans, carrots, radishes and lettuces.

I’ve never grown French beans before but I’m impressed. They were a bit tricky to get to germinate and many of the first ones fell to the ravages of slugs, but the ones that got established have been steady croppers: a one metre square bed has been giving a portion about every two or three days for the past month and is still going.

But I’ve got a mole again. The ground is very rocky so I’ve built raised beds filled with lovely, rich, slightly sandy compost. And blow me if a mole hasn’t burrowed through the underlying stoney level to come up in my raised beds. The compost is very light and can’t have enough strength to support his tunnels without caving in, but I guess for a mole it’s a bit like playing in a 'ball room' like those they have in Ikea, and he seems content to do the moley equivalent of swimming lengths. So now the beds look like the Western Front in WW1, with trenches, tunnels, mounds, pits and craters. It’s a good job I’ve got all my tomatoes well supported on canes as they and being constantly undermined. I was watering them yesterday evening when I noticed the leaves of one adjacent courgette plants starting to tremble. And as I watched the soil by its roots started to bulge, then erupted in a little volcano, and finally a little pink snout emerged. A beady eye briefly roved myopically around, glanced at me and gave me a cheeky wink, before the mole turned over and disappearing back underground. I think that’s the first time I’ve ever seen a live mole.

But moles aside  I’ve been particularly impressed with one raised bed. In November 2016 I planted broad beans which I eventually harvested in May. I then replanted with carrots which I harvested towards the end of July. Now, having resown the bed with late French beans, I’ve already got them coming up. They should be ready to start being harvested in early October. So that’ll be three crops from the same plot in twelve months. I had been partly following an old Ministry of Food, “Dig for Victory” pamphlet from 1942 giving detailed timings to maximise the number of crops that could be grown in each year. It was probably pushing it to get two legume crops, albeit interspersed with carrots, in a single year but being a raised bed the soil was fresh. Nevertheless I think the soil will appreciate the months over winter to rest and recuperate before it gets planted with tomatoes or courgettes next spring.

Sadly though when I pulled up the carrots, I didn’t get a nice surprise like this gardener, who found her long lost diamong ring around a carrot:



The Guardian : Canadian woman finds long-lost diamond ring wrapped around carrot


Last edited by Meles meles on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 12:33; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 10:28

Courgettes are one of the few things I bother planting these days, I have a packet of seeds from several years ago and one goes in each year in a wee pot on the kitchen window ledge and which duly germinates and gets planted out in a big tub later.This year's is duly providing one or two every week or so, enough for me without the massive marrow problem. For the first time this season though I planted a a yellow variety as well and I'm pleased with them. Not only are they an attractive colour but the fruits grow much more slowly than their common green siblings so don't balloon to zeppelin proportions when you're not looking.  I think I almost prefer the flowers though: fiori del zucca fritti - might make that today.

I hope you can gently persuade your mole to relocate, as a Scot I have a fondness for the little gentleman in black velvet.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 12:51

You needn't worry about Mr Mole, he's not doing any damage and the plants are all still growing happily, so I'm not going to bother him. Even the cats, while quite curious about the moving soil and trembling plants, don't seem inclined to try and catch him. Moles abound here but in ten years they've only presented me with one - I think I read somewhere that moles, like shrews, don't taste very nice. As I said the ground under the raised beds is very stoney and compacted, so his tunnelling is probably actually doing good by breaking up the hard layer and improving the drainage.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 14:12

And here we have a Black Velvet;

wiki:
The drink was first created by the bartender of Brooks's Club in London in 1861, to mourn the death of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's Prince Consort. It is supposed to symbolise the black or purple cloth armbands worn by mourners.

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 14:38

Re what too do with a glut of courgette-marrows, MM, am thinking of making a chutney that might resemble sticky sweet mango chutney to go with the endless pots of dhal I cook (it's the spice blend that should do it as mango chutney never tastes of mango really.) The kind of sour mango pickles I love cannot be bought here but I may try a rather grubby cornershop I know in the Midlands.

Apart from a glut of fruit and veg I have a flower shower too. Red Bishops have taken over a front plot and those along with begonias the main garden. Tomorrow I must cut back a huge trailing apricot begonia to  get down steps to the garden....I jest not.Next year it will be withdrawal symptoms as I shall cut down on all the extra feed and goodies.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 14:41

Re moles in your beds, MM - bury chicken wire netting next time you change the top compost.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 15:32

Faux mango chutney to accompany curries and other Indian spicey stuff ... brilliant idea, P. I'll give it a go too when I stumble across the next forgotten courge.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 15:38

Two good ideas for excess zucchini, both are yummy and both are great for using the extra large ones that are not good for very much else.

http://www.food.com/recipe/greek-stuffed-zucchini-kolokithakia-yemista-avgolemono-59368


http://www.closetcooking.com/2009/08/kolokithopita-greek-zucchini-pie.html
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 15:46

@Triceratops wrote:
And here we have a Black Velvet;

wiki:
The drink was first created by the bartender of Brooks's Club in London in 1861, to mourn the death of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's Prince Consort. It is supposed to symbolise the black or purple cloth armbands worn by mourners.



And here we have a Freddo Cappuccino

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 15:54

And there's also this suggestion for using up marrows ... from the 'Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate' (NSW, Australia) 6 November, 1954.

Marrow Rum
The days of bathtub gin and American prohibition are being recalled in Britain by witnesses of a boom in home brewing. Fostered by a good soft fruit crop and the derationing of sugar, Bacchanalian enthusiasm has flowered forth in a fascinating range of equipment, potencies and "bouquets." One of the more satisfying concoctions, it is reported, is marrow rum.

The recipe: Hollow one large marrow and fill with lump sugar. Hang in muslin bag over bowl. Marrow rots and liquid drips into bowl.  Bottle and keep for a year before drinking.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 20:05

Should you decide to stuff a lot of your little marrows, I have a proper courgette hollowing out tool that I bought in Lebanon and could post to you. It's a wee bit rusty but I'm sure you could clean it up. It's like this but rather more primitive.




What about Boureki if you're going Greek or something from Ottolenghi with a more Middle Eastern flavour. He had some other courgette recipes in the Guardian just a week or two ago.
And here's some courgette wine to go with them.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 Aug 2017, 20:43

Fiori di zucca fritti ... mmm! It's almost worth growing courgettes just for their flowers alone because unless you do, or know someone that does, you'll never get any fresh flowers as they are delicate and wilt so quickly. I usually deep fry them in a simple flour/water/egg batter, but I sometimes lightly stuff them with the classic Italian combination of mozarella and anchovy ... though not really "stuffed" as all it wants is a delicate hint of extra creamy/fishy flavour to complement and not overpower the courgette aroma.

The Kolokithopita pie sounds good ... very much like the 'boureki', Cretan-style courgette, potato, ricotta and mint pies that I've been making when swamped with courgettes. They can be eaten on their own, hot or cold, but are also a good accompaniment to, say, roast or grilled lamb.

I've currently got quite a few long aubergines fully ripe, so tomorrow I hope to get the time to make some proper moussaka: I've got all the ingredients, even lamb rather than beef mince, I just need a bit of time. Tomorrow I've got nobody arriving so it should be a good cooking afternoon ... and there's tomato passata to make, as well as tomatoes and peppers to stuff or otherwise preserve. But I do also need to go to the builders merchants to buy a good few sacks of ready-mix concrete to repair the driveway ... oh and some accelerant to get it to set in just a couple of hours as I've people constantly coming and going. As you said elsewhere above, ID, it is the mad season!

Edit : Crossed posts with ferval ...

Yes Boureki is a great as a use-up for surplusses, and frozen, it's a good stand-by dish too. And that little implement looks very much like the sort of potato-peelers/general veg broddlers, that are sold in all the pound stores here. This being southern France they are probably all made in Morocco or Algeria anyway. And yes, they rust too.
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